Radiation from smartphones may be leading to memory loss in teenagers

Radiation from smartphones could trigger memory loss in teenagers (and right-handed users are the most likely to suffer), new study reveals

  • Cumulative exposure to mobile phones negatively affects the figural memory
  • This refers to our ability to make sense of objects, patterns and shapes
  • Sending text messages and browsing the internet could also affect this ability
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Smartphone radiation could be destroying the memory performance of a new generation of adolescents, a troubling new study has warned.

Cumulative exposure to mobile devices over the course of a year negatively affects the figural memory of adolescents, scientists found.

Figural memory is mainly located in the right hemisphere of the brain and refers to our ability to make sense of objects including images, patterns and shapes.

Youngsters who hold their phone next to their right ear are the most affected by exposure to radiation.

However, sending text messages, playing mobile games, and browsing the internet may also have negative effects, albeit not as pronounced, the study showed.

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Scientists found that cumulative exposure to mobile phones over the course of a year negatively affects the figural memory of adolescents (stock image)

Researchers from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) studied nearly 700 adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 in Switzerland. 

They looked at the link between their daily exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) and their memory performance.

The effects of RF-EMF were more pronounced in adolescents using the mobile phone on the right side of the head, the study revealed.

‘This may suggest that indeed RF-EMF absorbed by the brain is responsible for the observed associations’, said Martin Röösli, Head of Environmental Exposures and Health at Swiss TPH.

Other aspects of wireless communication use, such as sending texts, playing games or browsing the Internet will also cause marginal RF-EMF exposure.

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However, these were not associated with the negative development of memory.

Dr Röösli emphasised that further research is needed to rule out the influence of other factors.

‘For instance, the study results could have been affected by puberty, which affects both mobile phone use and the participant’s cognitive and behavioural state.’

The potential effect of RF-EMF exposure to the brain is a relatively new field of scientific inquiry, according to the paper published in Environmental Health Perspectives.

‘It is not yet clear how RF-EMF could potentially affect brain processes or how relevant our findings are in the long-term’, said Dr Röösli.

‘Potential risks to the brain can be minimised by using headphones or the loud speaker while calling, in particular when network quality is low and the mobile phone is functioning at maximum power.’ 


Although talking on the phone leaves users exposed to the highest levels of radiation, sending text messages, playing on games and browsing the internet may also affect us (stock image)

WHAT CAN YOU DO TO REDUCE THE IMPACT OF RADIATION FROM YOUR PHONE?

Cell phones transmit information using low frequency radio signals, which may expose us to unhealthy radiation, especially when streaming or downloading large files.

Research has not been able to prove definitively that cell phone radiation is dangerous, but there have been enough studies linking the two to warrant caution, especially for children.

Here are some simple way to reduce the amount of radiation you are exposed to:  

– Use your cell phone on speakerphone or use a headset to avoid close contact with your ears and head.

– Headsets also release a small amount of radiation, so only wear them when you’re on a call.

– Use text messages instead of talking on the phone when possible.

– Do not carry your cell phone in your pocket, bar or on your belt. Keep it in a bag, backpack or briefcase.

– Sleep with your phone several feet from the bed, not in the bed or on a nearby nightstand.

– Keep your phone off or on airplane mode when it is not in use. 

In 2016 it was revealed that RF-EMF can cause a pain response in amputees.

Researchers claimed to have scientific evidence to support the anecdotal reports made by people with amputated limbs.

The research, published in the journal PLOS ONE , found that in rats with an amputation-like injury the animals showed clear evidence of pain in the presence of the signals.

Dr Mario Romero-Ortega, senior author of the study and an associate professor at the University of Texas at Dallas, said: ‘Our study provides evidence, for the first time, that subjects exposed to cellphone towers at low, regular levels can actually perceive pain.’

‘Our study also points to a specific nerve pathway that may contribute to our main finding.’

The rats were exposed to EMF signals equivalent to standing near a mobile phone tower almost 131ft (40 metres) away.

Animals received exposure for ten minutes, once a week for eight weeks.

They found that after four weeks, 88 per cent of rats with the nerve injury showed a definite pain response to the signal.

‘Many believe that a neuroma has to be present in order to evoke pain. Our model found that electromagnetic fields evoked pain that is perceived before neuroma formation; subjects felt pain almost immediately,’ explained Dr Romero-Ortega.

‘My hope is that this study will highlight the importance of developing clinical options to prevent neuromas, instead of the current partially effective surgery alternatives for neuroma resection to treat pain’, he said.

HOW SEVERE IS SMARTPHONE ADDICTION?

With the average age for a child to get their first phone now just 10, young people are becoming more and more reliant on their smartphones.

Worrying research from Korea University suggests that this dependence on the technology could even be affecting some teens’ brains.

The findings reveals that teenagers who are addicted to their smartphones are more likely to suffer from mental disorders, including depression and anxiety.

Other studies have shown people are so dependent on their smartphone that they happily break social etiquette to use them.

Researchers from mobile connectivity firm iPass surveyed more than 1,700 people in the US and Europe about their connectivity habits, preferences and expectations.

The survey revealed some of the most inappropriate situations in which people have felt the need to check their phone – during sex (seven per cent), on the toilet (72 per cent) and even during a funeral (11 per cent).

Nearly two thirds of people said they felt anxious when not connected to the Wi-Fi, with many saying they’d give up a range of items and activities in exchange for a connection.

Sixty-one per cent of respondents said that Wi-Fi was impossible to give up – more than for sex (58 per cent), junk food (42 per cent), smoking (41 per cent), alcohol (33 per cent), or drugs (31 per cent).

A quarter of respondents even went so far as to say that they’d choose Wi-Fi over a bath or shower, and 19 per cent said they’d choose Wi-Fi over human contact.

 

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