‘World’s only’ woolly mammoth hair hat goes on sale in Russia

‘World’s only’ woolly mammoth hair hat goes on sale for £8,000 in Russia (but experts say it’s too prickly to enjoy wearing!)

  • Vladimir Ammosov, a 44-year-old builder, had the unique hat created from a pelt
  • This was retrieved from the permafrost in remote Siberia where the beast died
  • Mr Ammosov bought the wool from his uncle who dug a mammoth out of the ice
  • Certificate from expert Semyon Grigoriev confirms that the wool is genuine
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The ‘world’s only’ mammoth hair hat is on-sale in Russia for £8,000 ($10,000) – but wearing the headwear might be an even bigger irritation than the price tag.

According to mammoth expert Semyon Grigoriev, the crocheted beanie is the ‘prickliest’ hat he has ever felt, describing the sensation of wearing it like a ‘head massage’.

The headwear – which is odourless – was knitted from the coat of a woolly mammoth, a species which died around 10,000 years ago.

A certificate from Grigoriev, who works as the director of the Mammoth Museum in Russia, appears to confirm the wool is genuine.

The hat is now on sale with a price tag of £8,000 ($10,000).

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Wearing a garment made out of a rare species is considered by many to be rather bad taste. But this beany hat is truly one of a kind, having been knitted from the coat of a woolly mammoth, a species which died out thousands of years ago


Vladimir Ammosov, a 44-year-old builder from Yakutsk, Siberia (pictured), had the hat created from a pelt retrieved from the permafrost in remote Siberia where the Ice Age beast died

Vladimir Ammosov, a 44-year-old builder from Yakutsk, Siberia, had the hat created from a pelt retrieved from the permafrost in remote Siberia where the Ice Age beast died.

Mr Ammosov said he bought the wool from his uncle, who’d originally dug it out of the ice.

He added: ‘My relative went to a woolly mammoth graveyard site at Kazachye village in Ust-Yanskiy in Yakutia.

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This image shows Mammoth hair displayed at the Mammoth Museum in Yakutsk Copy to caption PMS transfer info


Mr Ammosov said he bought the wool (pictured) from his uncle, who’d originally dug it out of the ice


Mr Ammosov added: ‘My relative went to a woolly mammoth graveyard site at Kazachye village in Ust-Yanskiy in Yakutia’

‘He picked up a full plastic bag of woolly mammoth hair and later sold it to me because he needed money.

‘I kept looking at the bag, wondering what to do with the hair, and then thought why not to try and make a hat?

‘In Yakutia, we make traditional round hats of horse hair, so why not to try and use mammoth hair and to create something truly unique?’

The bundle was given to an expert knitter to make the crocheted, rough textured skull cap. It is purportedly rather prickly to wear.

Semyon Grigoryev, director of Yakutia’s Mammoth Museum, confirmed that this was indeed authentic hair from the extinct beasts.

‘This was the prickliest hat I have ever worn,’ the expert told the Siberian Times.

‘It is completely odourless, but unlike, say, bisons, woolly mammoth had really rough hair. Wearing the hat felt like I was having a head massage’.   


A certificate from mammoth expert Semyon Grigoriev (pictured) – director of the Mammoth Museum in Russia – apparently confirms that the wool is genuine


As well as certifiying the hat, Mr Grigoriev said: ‘This was the prickliest hat I have ever worn. ‘It is completely odourless, but unlike, say, bisons, woolly mammoth had really rough hair’

Traditionally round crocheted hats made of horse hair are worn by men on special occasions like the Yakutian news year holiday or Yhyakh, the summer solstice, the paper reports.

‘We believe these hats are worn by men; I think it cones from older times when such hats were worn under warriors helmets,’ said Mr Ammosov

‘But since we live in 21st century, I don’t see any problem with a woman or a child purchasing and wearing the hat.’ 

Maria Kim from Megino-Kangalassky district, who makes traditional horse hair hats, told the Siberian Times: ‘People who wear them say that the constant feeling of skin massage helps with blood pressure and normalises headaches.’ 


The unique mammoth hat is made from a mammoth pelt retrieved from the permafrost in remote Siberia where the Ice Age beast died thousands of years ago 


The woolly mammoth roamed the icy tundra of Europe and North America for 140,000 years, disappearing at the end of the Pleistocene period, 10,000 years ago

WHAT ARE WOOLLY MAMMOTHS?

The woolly mammoth roamed the icy tundra of Europe and North America for 140,000 years, disappearing at the end of the Pleistocene period, 10,000 years ago.

They are one of the best understood prehistoric animals known to science because their remains are often not fossilised but frozen and preserved.

Males were around 12 feet (3.5m) tall, while the females were slightly smaller.

Curved tusks were up to 16 feet (5m) long and their underbellies boasted a coat of shaggy hair up to 3 feet (1m) long.

Tiny ears and short tails prevented vital body heat being lost.

Their trunks had ‘two fingers’ at the end to help them pluck grass, twigs and other vegetation.


The Woolly Mammoth is are one of the best understood prehistoric animals known to science because their remains are often not fossilised but frozen and preserved (artist’s impression)

They get their name from the Russian ‘mammut’, or earth mole, as it was believed the animals lived underground and died on contact with light – explaining why they were always found dead and half-buried.

Their bones were once believed to have belonged to extinct races of giants.

Woolly mammoths and modern-day elephants are closely related, sharing 99.4 per cent of their genes.

The two species took separate evolutionary paths six million years ago, at about the same time humans and chimpanzees went their own way.

Woolly mammoths co-existed with early humans, who hunted them for food and used their bones and tusks for making weapons and art. 

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