Some NYC homes really have private pools

You can find almost anything you want in New York City — unless you’re looking for a home with a private swimming pool.

“I truly do feel like we are living the dream,” said Brooklynite Nick Caragiulo, one of the lucky few to own an in-ground pool in the city. “[We’re] very fortunate to have this.”

Some other locals, meanwhile, are bringing their aquatic dreams up to the roof.

Keith Jacobson installed his swimming hole on the roof of a 12-story condo building in Chelsea.

“It’s my escape,” he said. “I just have to head upstairs.”

Try to control your jealousy as you take a peek at these city dwellers’ summer paradises.

The Family Gathering Spot in Ditmas Park

When Andrew Rosenblum first saw this home in 2010, he said no — because of the 14-by-30-foot pool. “Too much work,” he told his wife, Marjorie Henning.

But the software developer took the plunge, and it’s changed his life. Rosenblum and son Sam, 18, enjoy playing volleyball in the water, and he and his wife dine al-fresco.

Another fan: Coco, the family’s Italian water dog, who loves taking a dip. (Rosenblum and Henning, who paid $1.2 million for the place, also have a daughter, Emily, 21.) Now, said Rosenblum, “I think the pool’s the best part.”

The Party Pad in West Chelsea

South Africa native Keith Jacobson grew up with a backyard pool but figured he’d never be so lucky to have another one after he moved to New York City in 1985. But the real estate developer, now 55, bought a $7 million West Chelsea duplex in 2011 that came with a 2,000-square-foot roof terrace — and made his dream come true. Jacobson tapped designer Francis D’Haene to create a party-ready space, complete with an outdoor kitchen, wet bar and 20-by-10-foot raised pool.

“It isn’t just a pool to swim in,” said Jacobson. “It’s a pool to entertain around.”

During NYC Pride weekends in June, Jacobson typically hosts pre-parties for the Dance on the Pier event — but this year, he’ll be traveling. “I’m sure I’m going to get a lot of texts from people wondering where their invitation is!”

The Miniature Escape in NoMad

“Why do we need a summer house?” said Jillian Crane, an actress and writer. “This is our summer house! We can grill, [then] take a dip.”

Located on one of seven terraces of Crane and husband Al Kahn’s five-story home, their pool measures just 15-by-6 feet, but is mightily impressive: There’s an option that creates a current so you can swim in place, and the water heats up for hot-tub use.

Come the Fourth of July, it’s the best seat in town. “The pool is exactly opposite the [annual East River] fireworks,” said Kahn, a licensing executive who coined the names of Cabbage Patch Kids and Pokémon.

But this will likely be their last summer to enjoy the views. The two, who have no children, are moving to Los Angeles to be closer to work in Asia and will buy a smaller place in Manhattan. The luxury condo is now listed with Douglas Elliman for $10.9 million. (The couple bought the home in 2012 for $5.02 million, public records show.)

There’s one Manhattan bug that will be fixed in California: “Buying a floatie in New York City is a challenge,” said Kahn. “No one has pools!”

The Windsor Terrace Suburban Oasis

Lounging in Nick and Hilda Caragiulo’s Brooklyn backyard, you could be tricked into thinking you were in suburbia. There’s a patio and a lawn with a swing set. There’s even an in-ground pool — waterslide included — loaded with floats in the shapes of pizza and a popsicle.

“We likely would’ve left the borough if we didn’t find this house,” said Nick, 45, who runs Transcend Construction. “We wanted a house with a pool and we wanted the space.”

He and Hilda, 43 and a stay-at-home mom, bought their two-story townhouse in 2001 for around $550,000 and had the 12-by-20-foot pool installed a year later, next to their garage (above).

Now their daughters Isabella, 12, Sofia, 10, and Adrianna, 7, are some of the most popular kids in the neighborhood. “Every day [in the summer], practically, we invite friends over,” said Isabella.

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