Waitrose launches wine in a can ‘environmentally friendly’ alternative

Waitrose launches wine in a can as ‘environmentally friendly’ alternative to bottles for festival season

  • The high-end supermarket chain’s new cans hold 250ml and cost £3.49
  • Among the new range is an organic rosé sold in a striking pink container 
  • Move will answer calls for environmentally friendly packaging for wines

Among the range is an organic rosé, sold in a striking pink container

Wines in cans will be hitting the shelves of Waitrose tomorrow.

The high-end supermarket is getting on board with the US-led trend just in time for the festival season.

It is hoped the new product will provide a nifty alternative to bottles for summer revelers.

The move will also answer calls for environmentally friendly packaging for wine.

The cans will hold 250ml – the equivalent of a large glass of wine – and are priced at £3.49.

Among the range is an organic rosé, sold in a striking pink container. 

Waitrose wine buyer Victoria Mason told The Sun Online: ‘We’re really excited to bring back the trend of wine in a can.

‘As the festival season approaches, these new cans are perfect to pack in a picnic and they have the benefit of being recyclable too.’ 

Waitrose recently came under the spotlight after it received the lowest rating among supermarkets for its attempts to cut down on food waste.

It scored only eight out of 32 in a survey by campaign group Feedback.


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The survey assessed four elements:

1. How open the stores were about publishing figures on waste

2. Stores’ efforts to cut waste

3. Stores’ efforts to redistribute surplus food to charity

4. Stores’ efforts to help suppliers and customers throw away less

Waitrose recently came under the spotlight after it received the lowest rating among supermarkets for its attempts to cut down on food waste

Also poorly rated were Iceland, Marks & Spencer and Co-op, while Tesco came out best, with 21 out of 32.

The survey criticised stores for special offers that drive shoppers to buy more than they need.

It also attacked ‘best-before labels’ which encourage customers to throw out perfectly good food.

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