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Woman suffered severe vomiting for 17 YEARS after near constant marijuana use caused a mysterious condition

A WOMAN suffered periodic episodes of violent vomiting and abdominal pains for 17 years because of her near constant cannabis use.

At its worst Chalfonte LeNee Queen's illness would leave her bedridden for days, crying out for her mum.

The San Diego woman lost her job as a model and racked up tens of thousands of pounds in medical bills trying to get to the bottom of what was causing her to be so unwell.

Worried she had "some sort of cancer they couldn't detect" Chalfonte visited the hospital three times a year for nearly two decades until she was finally diagnosed with cannabinoid hyperemesis.

Medics still know very little about the condition, except that it is linked to chronic cannabis use.

It causes cycles of severe nausea and vomiting which can be relieved by taking a hot bath.

The exact cause of the condition is not known but one theory is that one of the three main chemicals in marijuana, called cannabinoids, interacts badly with a cannibinoid receptor in the gut to cause vomiting and nausea.

For 48-year-old Chalfonte, it meant years of discomfort and worry before doctors finally worked out what was wrong.

At the illnesses worst she weighed just eight stone.

"I've screamed out for death," she told KUNC News.

"I've cried out for my mom, who's been dead for 20 years, mentally not realising she can't come to me."

There is know known cure for the condition other than to stop using cannabis, but some doctors have noted that patients are sceptical their drug use is causing their illness.

And regular anti-nausea drugs don't have any effect on a patient's periods of vomiting.

One study, from Colorado, noted that since the laws around marijuana had been loosened there had been an increase in people going to hospital with unexplained periods of vomiting.

Dr Kennon Heard, an emergency room doctor at the University of Colorado who co-authored the study, said: "Five years ago, this wasn't something that doctors had on their radar.

"We're at least making the diagnosis more now."

For now, Chalfonte is struggling to quit using cannabis altogether but has managed her symptoms so they are now a dull stomach ache.

She says she now only smokes a couple of times a day, as opposed to when she was smoking on a near constant basis when she was ill.

But claims it is the only thing that helps ease her depression and anxiety so she plans to continue using it.

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