Dame Helen Mirren, 75, says she is 'fine' looking her age

‘It’s more about accepting who you are’: Dame Helen Mirren, 75, says she is ‘fine’ looking her age and rules out ever getting plastic surgery

She’s had a successful career in acting for more than 45 years. 

And Dame Helen Mirren, 75, has insisted that she is ‘fine’ with looking her age and ruled out ever getting plastic surgery. 

The Oscar-winning actress also admitted that she would ‘love to look 20 years younger’ but she ‘doesn’t’ and ‘never will’.

Radiant: Dame Helen Mirren, 75, has insisted that she is ‘fine’ with looking her age and ruled out ever getting plastic surgery (pictured in February)  

Helen said that ‘ageing gracefully’ should be about ‘accepting who you are’ as opposed to plastic surgery.   

The Oscar-winning actress told The Mirror: ‘I’m old! And I look it. And that’s just fine.’ 

Helen said that she doesn’t know what ‘ageing gracefully’ means but it seems to mean not having plastic surgery. 

She added: ‘We seem to have got to a point where it means not having plastic surgery, though I should have thought there’d be more to it than that. To me it’s more about accepting who you are and what you are and going with it.

Looking back: The Oscar-winning actress also admitted that she would ‘love to look 20 years younger’ but she ‘doesn’t’ and ‘never will’ (pictured in 1991) 

‘Obviously I try to look as nice as I can – and I’d love to look 20 years younger. But I don’t and I never will.’ 

It comes after Helen, who joined the Royal Shakespeare Company aged 20, said the playwright shouldn’t be taught at school. 

The actress said that youngsters should instead see his works on stage and ‘droning through’ the plays in a classroom could be off-putting. 

During a Zoom conversation with RSC artistic director Gregory Doran, she said: ‘I don’t think Shakespeare should be taught in schools. 


‘Ageing gracefully’: Helen said that ‘ageing gracefully’ should be about ‘accepting who you are’ as opposed to plastic surgery (pictured in January this year, left, and in 1993, right)

‘All young people’s experience of Shakespeare should be live theatre.’

She added that watching a production might be more likely to spark an enthusiasm in his writing. 

However, she admitted it was a challenge to make the ‘sometimes archaic language alive and accessible’.  

Accepting who you are: Helen said ‘ageing gracefully’ to her means ‘accepting who you are and what you are and going with it’ (pictured in January this year) 

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