George Clooney fires back at Kentucky Attorney General

‘I was taught in the schools and churches of Kentucky’: George Clooney fires back at Kentucky AG who criticized celebs for commenting on Breonna Taylor case having never lived in the state

  • One of the three Louisville, Kentucky police officers involved in the shooting of Breonna Taylor has been charged 
  • The results of the Kentucky grand jury’s investigation came a full 194 days after the death of the 26-year-old EMT 
  • Leaders in Louisville, Kentucky and across the nation are now bracing for widespread protests and unrest 
  • The Louisville mayor declared a citywide curfew will be in place for the next 72 hours 
  • Celebrity reactions spanned from disbelief to anger, with many pointing out the disparity between Taylor’s death and the charges 
  • Louisville detective Brett Hankinson was not indicted for causing Taylor’s death but on three counts of the class D felony of wanton endangerment 

Celebrities reacted with outrage to a Kentucky grand jury’s decision to indict only one of the police officers being investigated for their roles in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor.

And as the messages poured in, Kentucky AG Daniel Cameron was quick to dismiss critics as ‘celebrities, influencers and activists who [have] never lived in Kentucky’ in remarks made shortly after the grand jury’s decision. 

However, George Clooney fired back that he said he was ‘ashamed’ by the outcome of the grand jury – and pointed out he was ‘born and raised in Kentucky’.


George Clooney [L, in 2019] has fired back at Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron [R, on Wednesday] who dismissed ‘celebrities and influencers’ critical of Breonna Taylor grand jury verdict

Cameron downplayed the concerns of ‘activists’ in the wake of the grand jury’s outcome, which came over four months after the 26-year-old EMT’s death.     

‘There will be celebrities, influencers and activists who having never lived in Kentucky will try to tell us how to feel, suggesting they understand the facts of this case, that they know our community and the Commonwealth better than we do, but they don’t,’ Cameron said.

‘Let’s not give in to their attempts to influence our thinking or capture our emotions.’

In response to that, Kentucky native Clooney offered a scathing response where he said he was ‘ashamed’ by the outcome of the grand jury.

Celebrities reacted with outrage to a Kentucky grand jury’s decision to indict only one of the police officers being investigated for their roles in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor

‘I was born and raised in Kentucky,’ Clooney wrote in a statement shared with the media. ‘Cut tobacco on the farms of Kentucky. Both my parents and my sister live in Kentucky. I own a home in Kentucky, and I was there last month.’ Seen here in 2019

‘I was born and raised in Kentucky,’ he wrote in a statement shared with the media. ‘Cut tobacco on the farms of Kentucky. Both my parents and my sister live in Kentucky. I own a home in Kentucky, and I was there last month. ‘

‘The justice system I was raised to believe in holds people responsible for their actions,’ he went on.

‘Her name was Breonna Taylor and she was shot to death in her bed by 3 white police officers, who will not be charged with any crime for her death. I know the community. I know the commonwealth. And I was taught in the schools and churches of Kentucky what is right and what is wrong. I’m ashamed of this decision.’

Kentucky’s Jefferson County Circuit Judge Annie O’Connell on Wednesday announced the grand jury’s decision to charge former detective Brett Hankison with three counts of wanton endangerment in connection to the police raid on the night of March 13.

The first-degree charge, a Class D felony which carries a penalty of up to five years in prison, relates to Hankinson shooting into the neighboring apartments during the incident, not Taylor’s death.

Kentucky native Clooney offered a scathing response where he said he was ‘ashamed’ by the outcome of the grand jury. Seen here with Amal Clooney in 2019

Kentucky’s Jefferson County Circuit Judge Annie O’Connell on Wednesday announced the grand jury’s decision to charge former detective Brett Hankison with three counts of wanton endangerment in connection to the police raid on the night of March 13

Hankinson was fired by the Louisville Metro Police Department in June after officials said he violated policy by ‘wantonly and blindly’ firing his gun during the raid.

Sgt Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove, who were also present at the time of the fatal operation, were not charged.

Neither the grand jury nor the presiding judge elaborated on the charges.

State Attorney General Daniel Cameron addressed the long-awaited decision shortly after the announcement in a news conference in Frankfort.

He gave a detailed account of the months-long investigation into the events leading up to deadly shooting, which he said had been pieced together by ballistics reports, 911 calls, and witness interviews, due to the lack of bodycam footage.

Hankinson was fired by the Louisville Metro Police Department in June after officials said he violated policy by ‘wantonly and blindly’ firing his gun during the raid

But Cameron, who is the state’s first Black attorney general, said that the officers were not charged because they acted in self-defense after Taylor’s boyfriend fired at them.

‘I certainly understand the pain that has been brought about by the tragic loss of Miss Taylor. I understand that as an attorney general … I understand that as a black man,’ Cameron told reporters.

‘This team, myself, and the representatives of the Attorney General’s office have taken a lot of criticism and scrutiny. But that scrutiny in many ways was misplaced because there was not a day that people in this office didn’t go to sleep thinking about this case.

‘Criminal law is not meant to respond to every sorrow and grief, and that is true here. But my heart breaks for the loss of Miss Taylor,’ the AG said.

Cameron, who is the state’s first Black attorney general, said that the officers were not charged because they acted in self-defense after Taylor’s boyfriend fired at them. Seen here is a memorial for the slain EMT, in Louisville, KY on Thursday

Along with the killing of George Floyd in Minnesota, Taylor’s case became a major touchstone for the nationwide protests that have gripped the nation since May – drawing attention to entrenched racism and demanding police reform. Riots in Portland ON on Wednesday

Investigators believe Cosgrove was responsible for firing the bullet that took Taylor’s life. Taylor was shot at least five times after officers barged into her apartment while acting on a search warrant for a drug investigation.

Her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, opened fire when police burst in, hitting Mattingly. Walker was charged with attempted murder of a police officer, but prosecutors later dropped the charge.

Walker had told police he heard knocking but didn’t know who was coming into the home and fired in self-defense.

Cameron said Cosgrove and Mattingly were not charged after investigators determined their actions were justified because Walker opened fire.

‘According to Kentucky law, the use of force by (Officers Jonathan) Mattingly and (Myles) Cosgrove was justified to protect themselves,’ he said. ‘This justification bars us from pursuing criminal charges in Miss Breonna Taylor’s death.’

The three officers did not take part in the obtaining of the warrant, he said.

U.S. Presidential candidate Joe Biden has made his stance on the matter clear, as seen in this recent tweet by the former Vice President

The raid had been widely reported by the media as a ‘no-knock’ warrant however, further investigations later proved the cops had knocked before entering.

Walker had also told investigators he did hear knocking, but maintained the cops had not identify themselves as police.

They knocked on Taylor’s apartment door and announced their presence outside, which Cameron said was corroborated by a neighbor who witnessed the arrival.

Getting no answer, Cameron said police officers ‘breached the door’ and gained entry into the apartment.

Mattingly entered first, and at the end of a corridor saw Taylor and with Walker who was pointing a gun.

Walker fired, injuring Mattingly in the thigh. Mattingly returned fire, and his colleagues began shooting soon after, Cameron said. Hankison fired 10 bullets, Cameron said.

Six bullets hit Taylor, though there is no ‘conclusive’ evidence that any came from Hankinson’s gun, Cameron said. Bullets fired by Hankison traveled into a neighboring apartment.

The first-degree charge, a Class D felony which carries a penalty of up to five years in prison, relates to Hankinson [pictured] shooting into the neighboring apartments during the incident, not Taylor’s death

Along with the killing of George Floyd in Minnesota, Taylor’s case became a major touchstone for the nationwide protests that have gripped the nation since May – drawing attention to entrenched racism and demanding police reform.

The wanton endangerment charges each carry a sentence of up to five years. Protesters began marching through the streets of Louisville, where Taylor was killed, after the announcement, shouting ‘No justice, no peace.’ Some sat quietly and cried.

Attorney Ben Crump, who is representing Taylor’s family, called the grand jury’s decision ‘outrageous and offensive!’

‘Justice has NOT been served,’ tweeted Linda Sarsour of Until Freedom, a group that has pushed for charges in the case

Meanwhile in Louisville, officials had been bracing for more protests and possible unrest as the public nervously awaits the decision.

In a midday press conference, Mayor Greg Fischer announced he will impose a 72-hour curfew in the city, from 9pm to 6.30am.

‘No matter what Attorney General Cameron announces, I urge everyone to commit, once again, to a peaceful, lawful response,’ the mayor told reporters.

Taylor, 26, was killed shortly after midnight on March 13 when three plainclothes officers used a battering ram to force their way in to her Louisville home with a so-called no knock warrant

While emphasizing he does not know the grand jury’s finding, the mayor has declared a state of emergency in the city, and Louisville Metro Police Department has closed off much of downtown to vehicles.

Taylor, 26, was killed shortly after midnight on March 13 when three plainclothes officers used a battering ram to force their way in to her Louisville home with a so-called no knock warrant.

Fearing intruders, her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, fired a gun. The three officers fired their guns, striking Taylor five times.

Cameron, a Black Republican, has said his investigation into Taylor’s death is ongoing, but has declined to confirm media reports that he is convening a grand jury to vote on whether to bring criminal charges against the officers.

The city’s main federal courthouse has also been closed all week in an order by Chief Judge Greg Stivers of the Western District of Kentucky.

Last week, the city of Louisville agreed to pay Taylor’s family a record-breaking $12million in a wrongful death lawsuit that her mother Tamika Palmer filed against the city and its police department back in April. 

Source: Read Full Article