Lori Loughlin is 'ready to fight' college admissions charges

Lori Loughlin feels ‘hopeful’ about her college admissions trial after her lawyer presents new ‘evidence’… as daughter Olivia Jade shares bathroom selfies

Lori Loughlin is reportedly feeling better these days about the college admissions scandal she was pulled into in April 2019.

A source has told UsWeekly the 55-year-old Fuller House actress is ‘ready to fight’ after her lawyer claimed there is ‘new evidence that proves the FBI made the scam’s mastermind Rick Singer lie.’ They have already pleaded not guilty to all charges.

This report comes the same day her 20-year-old daughter Olivia Jade posted alluring fashion selfies from a bathroom in New York City. ‘Dream bathroom,’ she captioned the images.

Hope in the air: Lori Loughlin is reportedly feeling better these days about the college admissions scandal she was pulled into in April 2019. A source has told UsWeekly the 55-year-old Fuller House actress is ‘ready to fight’ after her lawyer claimed there is ‘new evidence that proves the FBI made the scam’s mastermind Rick Singer lie.’ See in 2017

Lori and her husband, Mossimo Giannulli, have been accused of paying $500,000 to get Olivia and her 21-year-old sister Bella admitted to the University of Southern California. 

But this week their lawyer Sean Berkowitz said there is new evidence that they are innocent. 

This has made Loughlin is ‘hopeful’ that she may be exonerated.

‘Lori is feeling motivated and ready to fight and has a renewed sense of hope with the recent evidence,’ a source told Weekly.

No stress here: This report comes the same day her 20-year-old daughter Olivia Jade posted alluring fashion selfies from a bathroom in New York City

Prosecutors reportedly found notes written by scam mastermind Rick Singer.

‘Singer’s notes indicate that FBI agents yelled at him and instructed him to lie by saying that he told his clients who participated in the in the alleged ‘side door’ scheme that their payments were bribes, rather than legitimate donations that went to the schools,’ Berkowitz claimed.  

Opening statements for their case are scheduled to begin on October 5, 2020.

This comes after a judge denied the couple’s request to delay the trial.

Two weeks ago, lawyers for the couple asked to delay the trial until February 2021 due to the complexity of evidence.  

U.S. District Judge Nathaniel Gorton instructed defense attorneys to file any motions to dismiss the case by March 13, otherwise the famous couple will be tried this year in Boston federal court alongside six other prominent parents accused of rigging the college admissions process.  

Hope? Lawyers for Loughlin and Giannulli said Wednesday that new evidence shows the couple is innocent of charges that they bribed their daughters’ way into the University of Southern California; seen in February 2019

Hot seat: Their  trial will begin October 5, a judge said Thursday. Seen here in April 2019 in Boston federal court

Loughlin’s co-defendants at trial will include Gamal Abdelaziz, former president of Wynn Resorts Ltd´s Macau subsidiary, and Robert Zangrillo, founder of the private investment firm Dragon Global. 

Seven others still fighting the charges will go to trial in January 2021, Judge Nathaniel Gorton said. 

Authorities say Loughlin and Giannulli helped create fake athletic profiles for the teens by sending the consultant at the center of the scheme, Rick Singer, photos of their teens posing on rowing machines.

The money was funneled through a sham charity operated by Singer, who has pleaded guilty to orchestrating the scheme, authorities say.

Loughlin and Giannulli’s lawyers had urged the judge to delay the setting of the trial dates in light of new evidence they received from prosecutors this week. 

The mastermind: Their lawyers said Wednesday they newly disclosed notes indicate FBI agents told scheme mastermind Rick Singer to lie by saying he told parents in the scam that the payments were bribes, not legitimate; seen in March 2019

They say this evidence bolsters the couple’s claim that they believed their payments were legitimate donations, not bribes.

Loughlin and Giannulli’s attorneys said in a filing late Wednesday that prosecutors provided them with notes from Singer’s iPhone. 

Singer says in the notes that FBI agents yelled at him and told him to lie to get parents to say things in recorded phone calls that could be used against them.

The lawyers also say Singer’s notes indicate that FBI agents told him to lie by saying he told parents who participated in the so-called ‘side door’ scheme that the payments were bribes, not legitimate donations.

Done with that: Actress Felicity Huffman, center, exits federal court in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.,in April 2019, has already done her time in jail

‘Loud and abrasive call with agents. They continue to ask me to tell a fib and not restate what I told my clients as to where the money was going – to the program and not the coach and that it was a donation and they want it to be a payment,’ Singer wrote, according to the filing.

Singer´s notes weren’t given to the defense until this week because the government believed they were privileged and didn’t review them further after discovering them in October 2018, prosecutors say.

Berkowtiz wrote in a Wednesday court filing: ‘This belated discovery … is devastating to the government’s case and demonstrates that the government has been improperly withholding core exculpatory information, employing a ‘win at all costs’ effort rather than following their obligation to do justice.’

Berkowtiz said in a court filing on Thursday that prosecutors’ explanation for not handing over the evidence sooner is ‘bogus.’ He accused the government of ‘egregious prosecutorial misconduct.’ 

‘The fact that someone made a donation to USC with the goal of getting their children into USC is not a crime,’ BJ Trach, another attorney for Loughlin, told the judge.

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