Anyone with at least 30,000 followers is officially a ‘celebrity’

Anyone with at least 30,000 followers on social media is officially a ‘celebrity’, UK advertising regulator reveals

  • The Advertising Standards Agency made the revelation in a landmark ruling 
  • It means anyone with 30,000 followers or more on social media is a ‘celebrity’ 
  • Comes case of blogger Sarah Willox Knott who is prominent on Instagram
  • She was found to be in breach of ASA regulations due to the size of her following

Anyone who has 30,000 social media followers now has the dubious and questionable honour of being considered a ‘celebrity’. 

It comes after UK Advertising Standards Agency made a landmark ruling in the case of an Instagram influencer, deeming a sponsored post unacceptable as the poster has ‘celebrity status’. 

The decision has ramifications beyond just mummy blogger, Sarah Willox Knott, 27, who was the subject of a case from the ASA, and means many people can now consider themselves famous. 

The ASA does say it will continue to review cases on an individual basis, and that smaller followings will be considered depending on the situation.  

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Anyone who has 30,000 social media followers now has the dubious and questionable honour of being considered a ‘celebrity’. Comes case of blogger Sarah Willox Knott who is prominent on Instagram (pictured)

HOW CAN YOU CHECK YOUR INSTAGRAM AD SETTINGS?  

Open up the Instagram app.

Head to Settings and click on Security, then Access Data. 

Tap on the button that says ‘Ads.’

From there, the app should show a list of ‘Ads Interests’ used to formulate targeted advertisements.  

The blogger posted an image to her ThisMamaLife Instagram account with a packet of Phenergan Night Time Tablets visible in the background.

Her photo, of her wearing a pair of pink and white stripped pyjamas, was picked up by the ASA for potentially breaching guidelines. 

The post was clearly marked as an advert and had been cleared by the healthcare trade body, the Proprietary Association of Great Britain. 

Sanofi, the firm behind the ad, argued the post was legal but the ASA ruled it did not account for the ‘celebrity’ status of the poster. 

At the time, the account had 32,000 followers. 

Sanofi countered by saying the platform is noticeably smaller than that of other ‘recognised celebrities’, such as David Beckham who has 55 million followers. 

The ASA concluded: ‘We considered over 30,000 followers indicated that she had the attention of a significant number of people. Given that she was popular with, and had the attention of a large audience, we considered that ThisMamaLife was a celebrity for the purposes of the CAP Code.’ 

It also pointed to the vast amount of sponsored posts from Ms Willox Knott, with more than 1,000 such posts on her account. 

 

 

 

 

 

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