Google app that matches your face to fine art launches worldwide

Celebrities are matched with some VERY unflattering doppelgangers by new Google Art Selfie app

Celebrities are matched with some VERY unflattering doppelgangers by new Google Art Selfie app that twins faces to famous paintings (so which work of art do YOU look like?)

  • Arts and Culture app is free to download on Google Play and Apple app Stores
  • It uses AI and machine learning to match a picture of a face to a painting
  • The app matched Tom Hiddleston to a portrait of Spain’s ruler King Philip II
  • Olivia Colman was matched with 19th century Dutch painter Gerrit Jan Michaelis

It’s worth doing a double take when you look at these images…

They are photos of Tom Hiddleston, Olivia Colman and Samantha Cameron along with portraits from the art world supposed to be their spitting images.

But the comparisons are not entirely flattering.

Google’s Arts Selfie, which launches worldwide today, matched the film and TV stars and former prime minister’s wife with paintings.


Hiddleston portrayed Henry V in the BBC adaptation of Shakespeare’s play of the same name, but the app suggests his perfect role could be as another monarch – he’s paired with a portrait of Spain’s 16th century ruler King Philip II

Hiddleston portrayed Henry V in the BBC adaptation of Shakespeare’s play of the same name.

But the app suggests his perfect role could be as another monarch – he’s paired with a portrait of Spain’s 16th century ruler King Philip II.


  • From dime novels and radio to video arcades and AOL…


    Facebook, Instagram, Messenger and WhatsApp go DOWN: Users…


    Need a hand? Bizarre backpack give you an extra set of arms…


    Trillion ton iceberg the size of Delaware that cracked off…

Share this article

Broadchurch’s Miss Colman, 44, may be rather disappointed with her double – a portrait of stocky curly-haired 19th century Dutch painter Gerrit Jan Michaelis by fellow artist Hendrik Willem Caspari.

Mrs Cameron, 47, was likened to the 17th century’s Henry Stuart, Duke of Gloucester, by another Dutch artist, Adriaen Hanneman.

The tool launches with Google’s Arts and Culture app worldwide today having being wildly popular in the US – and used by the likes of country singer Dolly Parton and Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again actress Amanda Seyfried.

Broadchurch’s Miss Colman, 44, may be rather disappointed with her double – a portrait of stocky curly-haired 19th century Dutch painter Gerrit Jan Michaelis by fellow artist Hendrik Willem Caspari

Mrs Cameron, 47, was likened to the 17th century’s Henry Stuart, Duke of Gloucester, by another Dutch artist, Adriaen Hanneman

CELEBRITIES AND THEIR PAINTED LOOKALIKES: THE FAMOUS FACES GOOGLE HAS MATCHED TO ART 

Tom Hiddleston – Portrait of Spain’s 16th century ruler King Philip II

Olivia Colman –  Portrait of 19th century Dutch painter Gerrit Jan Michaelis by fellow artist Hendrik Willem Caspari

Samantha Cameron – 17th century’s Henry Stuart, Duke of Gloucester, by Dutch artist Adriaen Hanneman

Prince Philip – Dutch grain traders, Isaac Abrahamszoon Massa in Seif Wanly’s Portrait of a Couple

Meghan Markle – 2013 painting Mimicry -Mitsuwana-, by Japanese artist Juuri Robertson

Kate Middleton – 1909 piece of Joaquín Sorolla’s eldest daughter Maria, in his oil painting Walk on the Beach

It is free to download on the Google Play and the Apple App Stores.

To match with a painting, you take a picture of yourself which will then be compared to thousands of works of art by Google’s AI software.

People must take and upload a selfie instead of using one from their camera roll, and the technology then matches the photo to five similar faces in paintings. 

Google has partnered with 650 galleries across the globe.

The tech giant hopes that young people will use the app and learn more about art in the process.

Only users in parts of the US and in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, India were able to use Art Selfie when it first launched earlier this year, but now it’s available to everyone. 

Other features of the app include the ability to recognise works of art and virtual tours of famous museums.

‘Your selfie becomes a doorway into art — tap on your lookalike to discover more information about it or an artist that perhaps you’ve never heard of before,’ explained product manager Michelle Luo.

For Prince Philip, he lives a rather different life to that of the shrewd-looking Dutch grain traders, Isaac Abrahamszoon Massa in Seif Wanly’s Portrait of a Couple

Google’s Arts and Culture app, of which Art Selfie is a feature, has been available for over a year to US residents. The tool compared Megan Markle to 2013 painting Mimicry -Mitsuwana-, by Japanese artist Juuri Robertson

Kate’s look-a-like is Joaquín Sorolla’s eldest daughter Maria, in his oil painting Walk on the Beach, painted in 1909

The Queen was noted for her resemblance to Cornelia van Schuylenburgh, the wife of Dutch 19th Century Baron Diederik van Bleyswijk, by Conrad Kuster

PRIVACY CONCERNS WITH GOOGLE’S SELFIE ART APP

Concerns were raised in January that Google was using its Arts and Culture app to secretly collect data on people’s faces.

Some dubbed the Selfie Art tool a ‘facial recognition database’.

American actress and activist Alyssa Milano posted on Twitter: ‘I mean, this google app that matches your face to a piece of fine art.

‘Anyone suspicious of just surrendering your facial recognition to google or are we confident they already have that at this point?’

Policy expert Yousef Munayyer tweeted: ‘The intern at Google who came up with this to dupe users into sending in images for its facial recognition databases is probably getting promoted….’

Google told MailOnline that uploaded images aren’t used for any other purpose and are deleted after the match is made. 

‘Together with our partner museums we are constantly experimenting with new ways for people to discover and interact with art.’ 

Earlier this year, the app took the internet by storm when users began comparing Britain’s royal family to famous works of art.

Newest Royals Kate Middleton, Camilla and Meghan Markle were all compared to modern works of art.

Markle was compared to a 2013 painting called Mimicry -Mitsuwana-, by Japanese artist Juuri Robertson.

The piece is allegedly based on a Japanese folklore tale, of a forked-tailed cat called Nekomata who can shape-shift into a human.

The Duchess of Cambridge was deemed similar to artist Joaquín Sorolla’s eldest daughter Maria, in his oil painting Walk on the Beach, painted in 1909.

But the Royal Family’s more bizarre list of lookalikes includes Prince Philip.

He had a 73 per cent match with shrewd-looking Dutch grain trader Isaac Abrahamszoon Massa in Seif Wanly’s Portrait of a Couple.

The Queen’s lookalike was Cornelia van Schuylenburgh, the wife of Dutch 19th Century Baron Diederik van Bleyswijk, by Conrad Kuster.

Prince Harry was matched with a portrait of a Spanish king found in Dulwich Picture Gallery

Prince Charles was matched up with a 17th century portrait of Jan van Lennep the elderly, which is held in the Rikjsmuseum in Amsterdam

Concerns were raised in January that Google was using the app to secretly collect data on people’s faces.

Some dubbed the Selfie Art tool a ‘facial recognition database’.

American actress and activist Alyssa Milano posted on Twitter: ‘I mean, this google app that matches your face to a piece of fine art.

Google has partnered with 650 galleries across the globe. The tech giant hopes that young people will use the app and learn more about art in the process

‘Anyone suspicious of just surrendering your facial recognition to google or are we confident they already have that at this point?’

Policy expert Yousef Munayyer tweeted: ‘The intern at Google who came up with this to dupe users into sending in images for its facial recognition databases is probably getting promoted….’

Google told MailOnline that uploaded images aren’t used for any other purpose and are deleted after the match is made. 

Source: Read Full Article