One in five British men says stress at work affects their performance in bedroom

If you’re experiencing issues in the bedroom, your work could be to blame, a new survey suggests.

The survey, by Zava, has found that nearly a quarter of British men say stress at work affects their sexual performance.

Zava surveyed 1,035 British men about their sex lives, and the factors that affect their performance in the bedroom.

The results revealed that 22% of men say that stress, anxiety and depression have caused them to experience erectile dysfunction (ED), while 20% said work-related stress often stops them having sex.

Meanwhile, 22% said that they’ve prioritised work over their sex lives by avoiding sex with their partner.

Delving deeper into the results, Zava found that men in higher managerial positions were more likely report ED, with 27% saying they regularly struggle with erections.


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And those who earned between £70,000 and £70,999 reported ED the most often.

Dr Clair Grainger, a doctor with Zava, said: “If your ED is caused by emotional changes or mental-health problems, talking to someone about how you feel can help.

“It may be useful to talk to a counsellor who specialises in sex therapy. A doctor can advise you on the best steps towards getting this support.”

The survey comes shortly after a study by Univia revealed that people who regularly masturbate are more likely to be managers at work.

While the reason for this link remains unclear, the researchers suggest that masturbating could help to improve your self-confidence.

They explained: “The boost in self-confidence that masturbation was previously shown to cause may be one major contributor to higher paychecks, for it can take a certain amount of confidence and bravery to ask your boss for a raise.

“In other words, masturbation may be correlating with the self-confidence boost needed to ask your supervisor to pay for what you deserve.”

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