Photographer watches a seagull choke down a corn on the cob husk

Seagull pictured CHOKING on a corn on the cob husk and stick, as photographer hits out at beachgoers who leave their litter behind

  • Photographer Pauline Guppy tried to intervene to stop the bird choking 
  • However, it flew away and swallowed the husk and wooden stick in one gulp 
  • The husk is potentially harmful to the bird when swallowed whole
  • Guppy has called for people to think carefully about how they throw away litter
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A photographer has slammed beachgoers who leave their litter behind on the beach after watching a seagull choke down a corn on the cob husk and stick whole.

Photographer Pauline Guppy tried to help the bird when she saw it struggling with the leftover food in its beak at the popular Sandbanks Beach in Poole, Dorset.

However, the bird flew away before she could help, swallowing the husk and wooden stick whole.

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A photographer has slammed beachgoers who leave their litter behind after watching a seagull choke down a corn on the cob husk and stick

The husk is potentially harmful to the bird when swallowed whole and, while Ms Guppy hopes the bird has been able to regurgitate it, she doesn’t know what happened after it flew off.

The photographer has called for people to think carefully about how they throw away their litter and food remnants.

Ms Guppy said: ‘When I realised what it was, I ran over to the bird, hoping to scare it into dropping the corn. But it just flew off a few feet away, actually swallowed it and had the stick poking out of its beak.

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‘After a few more swallows it was gone.’ 

Bournemouth and Poole spends about £500,000 ($650,000) a year keeping the beaches clean with six full-time and 15 seasonal staff members.

About 2,000 tonnes of waste is collected from the seafront each year. 

‘I couldn’t believe what I’d just seen’, said Ms Guppy.

‘It is not just plastic that is causing problems to wildlife – people should be more responsible for their rubbish.’ 


Pauline Guppy tried to help the bird when she saw it with leftover food in its beak at the popular Sandbanks Beach in Poole, Dorset (pictured)

Last month, it was revealed that even the most remote corners of our planet are covered in human waste.

Experts say that Mount Everest is now turning it into a ‘disgusting eyesore’ thanks to increasing numbers of big-spending climbers leaving their waste.

Fluorescent tents, climbing equipment, empty gas canisters and even human excrement litter the well-trodden route to the summit of the 29,029ft (8,848-metre) peak after being dumped by people paying little attention to the environment.

As the number of climbers on the mountain has soared – at least 600 people have scaled the world’s highest peak so far this year alone – the problem has worsened.

In 2017 climbers in Nepal brought down nearly 25 tonnes of trash and 15 tonnes of human waste – the equivalent of three double-decker buses – according to the Sagarmatha Pollution Control Committee (SPCC).

This season even more was carried down but this is just a fraction of the rubbish dumped each year, with only half of climbers lugging down the required amounts, the SPCC says.

WHAT IS BEING DONE TO REDUCE RUBBISH ON MOUNT EVEREST?

Decades of commercial mountaineering have turned Mount Everest into the world’s highest rubbish dump. 

As the number of climbers on the mountain has soared – at least 600 people have scaled the world’s highest peak so far this year alone – the problem of waste disposal has worsened. 

The worst rubbish is found at Camp Two, which is 21,000 foot (6,400m) above sea level. 

Five years ago Nepal implemented a $4,000 (£3,000) rubbish deposit per team that would be refunded if each climber brought down at least eight kilograms (18 pounds) of waste.

On the Tibet side of the Himalayan mountain, they are required to bring down the same amount and are fined $100 (£75) per kilogram if they don’t.

In 2017 climbers in Nepal brought down nearly 25 tonnes of trash and 15 tonnes of human waste – the equivalent of three double-decker buses – according to the Sagarmatha Pollution Control Committee (SPCC).

This season even more was carried down but this is just a fraction of the rubbish dumped each year, with only half of climbers lugging down the required amounts, the SPCC says.

Instead many climbers opt to forfeit the deposit, a drop in the ocean compared to the $20,000 (£15,000) – $100,000 (£75,000) they will have forked out for the experience.

Another solution, believes Ang Tsering Sherpa, former president of the Nepal Mountaineering Association, would be a dedicated rubbish collection team. 

 

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