Student demonstrates the world’s fastest jet pack

World’s fastest jet pack which reaches 50mph and costs £340,000 is built by a British student using a 3D printer

  • Student Sam Rogers has designed and demonstrated the world’s fastest jet pack
  • The five-turbojet engine suit is printed entirely in aluminium, steel and nylon 
  • It can fly from launch-pad to landing point with an altitude limit of 10,000ft
  • The company which produces the suit, Gravity Industries, has demonstrated the suit before at speeds of up to 32mph 

A design student has demonstrated the world’s fastest jet pack which can reach speeds of 50mph (80km/h) and climb to an altitude of 10,000 feet.

Sam Rogers, 23, from Loughborough University, created the suit, which cost £340,000 ($433,000) to make, entirely using a 3D printer.

Footage shows Mr Rogers, who studies Product Design and Tech, taking to the skies in the jet suit in front of amazed students at Loughborough Design School. 

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A British student has designed and flown the world’s fastest jet pack- reaching speeds of 50mph. Sam Rogers, from Loughborough University, perfected the redesign of a suit that was created entirely by a 3D printer – but still cost £340,000

HOW DID A STUDENT CREATE A 3D PRINTED JETPACK? 

Student Sam Rogers originally made the suit from traditional materials initially.

He then redesigned it to being entirely D printed in aluminium, steel and nylon, which reduced the time and cost of building the suit.

The suit has kerosene-fuelled turbines on the back and on the arms, each with  50 pounds (22kg) of thrust, with the controls located inside the grip handles. 

The five-turbojet engine race suit printed entirely in aluminium, steel and nylon was developed as part of his degree.

Crowds watched the pioneering 1,000BHP (brake horsepower) flying machine.

The company which produces the suit, Gravity Industries, has demonstrated the suit before at speeds of up to 32mph.

But Mr Rogers, from Sussex, has since flown his design at more than 50mph (80km/h).

Mr Rogers said: ‘Five turbojet engines spooling up on your body is a very intense and visceral experience.

‘To learn to balance, control and fly under that power feels very dynamic and the freedom of movement once airborne is like nothing else.

‘I redesigned the suit from traditional materials to being entirely 3D printed in aluminium, steel and nylon, which reduced the time and cost of building the suit.’

The suit has kerosene-fuelled turbines on the back and on the arms, each with 50lbs (22kg) of thrust, with the controls located inside the grip handles.

It has been created to fly from launch-pad to landing point regardless of the terrain – land or water – with an altitude limit of 10,000ft.

He added: ‘Multiple versions of the suit were tested with leg engines and various other engines configurations.

The suit has kerosene-fuelled turbines on the back and on the arms, each with 22kg of thrust, with the controls located inside the grip handles. It has been created to fly from launch-pad to landing point regardless of the terrain – land or water – with an altitude limit of 10,000ft

The five-turbojet engine race suit printed entirely in aluminium, steel and nylon was developed as part of Sam’s degree. Crowds watched the pioneering 1,000BHP (brake horsepower) flying machine

Sam, who studies Product Design and Technology, took to the skies in the record-breaking Gravity Industries jet suit in front of amazed students at Loughborough Design School.

‘And I found that turbines on the arms and back was the optimal configuration.

But the technical development has not stopped.

Sam said that plans are now in the pipeline for a faster, more powerful and lightweight suit as well as wing prototypes for horizontal flight. 

Doctor Andrew Johnson, Lecturer in Product Design and group member, said: ‘This project is a great way to highlight that additive manufacturing is playing an ever-increasing role in the design and manufacture of prototype and end-use products.’

WHAT IS 3D PRINTING AND HOW DOES IT WORK?

First invented in the 1980s by Chuck Hull, an engineer and physicist, 3D printing technology – also called additive manufacturing – is the process of making an object by depositing material, one layer at a time.

Similarly to how an inkjet printer adds individual dots of ink to form an image, a 3D printer adds material where it is needed, based on a digital file.

Many conventional manufacturing processes involved cutting away excess materials to make a part, and this can lead to wastage of up to 30 pounds (13.6 kilograms) for every one pound of useful material, according to the Energy Department’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee.

By contrast, with some 3D printing processes about 98 per cent of the raw material is used in the finished part, and the method can be used to make small components using plastics and metal powders, with some experimenting with chocolate and other food, as well as biomaterials similar to human cells.

3D printers have been sued to manufacture everything from prosthetic limbs to robots, and the process follows these basic steps:

· Creating a 3D blueprint using computer-aided design (CAD) software

· Preparing the printer, including refilling the raw materials such as plastics, metal powders and binding solutions.

· Initiating the printing process via the machine, which builds the object.

· 3D printing processes can vary, but material extrusion is the most common, and it works like a glue gun: the printing material is heated until it liquefies and is extruded through the print nozzle

· Using information from the digital file, the design is split into two-dimensional cross-sections so the printers knows where to put the material

· The nozzle deposits the polymer in thin layers, often 0.1 millimetre (0.004 inches) thick.

· The polymer rapidly solidifies, bonding to the layer below before the build platform lowers and the print head adds another layer (depending on the object, the entire process can take anywhere from minutes to days.)

· After the printing is finished, every object requires some post-processing, ranging from unsticking the object from the build platform to removing support, to removing excess powders. 

 

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