Tragic image shows the skeleton of a turtle wrapped in plastic netting

Heartbreaking image of a decomposed green sea turtle with the plastic net that killed it still wrapped around its shell

  • The body of the green sea turtle has completely decomposed
  • The image was taken by a film crew at the Cape York Peninsular, Australia
  • They were both shocked and saddened by what they saw 
  • They have released the image to raise of the global issue of ‘ghost netting’ 
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A shocking picture shows a dead turtle still wrapped in the plastic that killed it.

The body of the green sea turtle has completely decomposed – but the plastic netting remains in tact months later.

The heartbreaking image was taken by a film crew making an ocean documentary while shooting on location at the Cape York Peninsular, Australia.

They were both shocked and saddened by what they saw and have released the image to raise of the global issue of ‘ghost netting’.

Earlier this week devastating images of monkeys clutching plastic bottles, carrying crisp packets and placing carrier bags over their heads were caught on camera.

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A shocking picture shows a dead turtle still wrapped in the plastic that killed it. The body of the green sea turtle has completely decomposed – but the plastic netting remains in tact months later

The picture is taken from the upcoming environmental film Blue, which will be shown at the Ocean Film Festival UK & Ireland Tour.

Unable to free itself, the turtle died and decomposed on the beach with the net still firmly lodged around its shell. 

Rosie Fuller, 36, tour coordinator, said: ‘These pictures show the horrific effects of plastic pollution and ghost nets on marine life and the world’s oceans.

‘Blue highlights issues faced by marine life around the globe, often in wild and remote places that you would imagine are untouched by the modern world.

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‘The reality is very different.’

Experts believe that over the past decade 10,000 turtles have been impacted by the ghost nets off northern Australia alone.

‘The drifting nets capture all kinds of sea life, but turtles are the most affected as they swim and feed in the currents that carry the nets’, said Ms Fuller.


The heartbreaking image was taken by a film crew making an ocean documentary while shooting on location at the Cape York Peninsular, Australia

‘They have no chance once they are caught in the nets, and can drift for days before eventually drowning.’ 

Ms Fuller continued: ‘Currently just under 60 per cent of seabirds have ingested plastic; this figure is expected to rise to 99 per cent by 2050.

‘Often a bird will be killed by its parent, which has accidentally brought plastic items to their chicks, mistaking them for food’, she said.

In Blue, Dr Jennifer Lavers, who works with seabirds on the remote Lord Howe Island in the South Pacific, explains that she has found baby birds with more than 275 pieces of plastic in their stomachs.

‘If not fatal, this can cause them to be drastically underweight and undersized, with stunted wings – not a good start for their 5,000km [3,100-mile] migration’, said Ms Fuller. 


The picture is taken from the upcoming environmental film Blue, which will be shown at the Ocean Film Festival UK & Ireland Tour. Unable to free itself, the turtle died and decomposed on the beach with the net still firmly lodged around its shell


The film crew were both shocked and saddened by what they saw and have released the image to raise of the global issue of ‘ghost netting’

‘Half of all marine life has been lost in the last 40 years. Fish populations are in decline.

‘Around one in four species of sharks, rays and skates is now threatened with extinction, due primarily to overfishing.’

By 2050 there is set to be more plastic in the sea than fish. 

‘There’s a plastic cesspool in our seas and it’s doubling in size every 10 years’, said Ms Fuller.

‘The statistics are dark, but Blue shows that there is a way forward, and the time to act is now.

‘All around the world people are making the decision to protect our oceans, and you can join them.’

Blue is showing as part of the Ocean Film Festival World Tour and will be coming to venues around the UK and Ireland this autumn. 

Earlier this week heartbreaking images from Thailand showed the devastating effect plastic is having on macaque monkeys.


These heartbreaking images show the devastating effect reckless tourism in Thailand is having on its wildlife population. Here, a macaque monkey is toying with a plastic bag in a tree after it was discarded by tourists

Captured by a British tourist holidaying in Thailand, these creatures are a tragic illustration of the plastic plight caused by travellers overseas.

Litter strewn across the beaches and streets by careless visitors makes it all too easy for these Macaque monkeys to reach it and put themselves in danger.

In one of the pictures a monkey sits in a tree and appears to be suffocating on a plastic bag.

WHAT DOES THE DEEP-SEA DEBRIS DATABASE REVEAL ABOUT OCEAN PLASTIC POLLUTION?

Plastic pollution is a scourge that is ravaging the surface of our planet. Now, the polluting polymer is sinking down to the bottom of the ocean. 

The deepest part of the ocean is found in the Mariana Trench, located in the western Pacific Ocean, to the east of the Mariana Islands. It stretches down nearly 36,100 feet (11,000 metres) below the surface.

One plastic bag was found 35,754 feet (10,898 metres) below the surface in this region, the deepest known piece of human-made pollution in the world. This single-use piece of plastic was found deeper than 33 Eiffel towers, laid tip to base, would reach.

Whilst the plastic pollution is rapidly sinking, it is also spreading further into the middle of the oceans. A piece of plastic was found over 620 miles (1,000 km) from the nearest coast – that’s further than the length of France.

The Global Oceanographic Data Center (Godac) of the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (Jamstec) launched for public use in March 2017. 

In this database, there is the data from 5,010 different dives. From all of these different dives, 3,425 man-made debris items were counted. 

More than 33 per cent of the debris was macro-plastic followed by metal (26 per cent), rubber (1.8 per cent), fishing gear (1.7 per cent), glass (1.4 per cent), cloth/paper/lumber (1.3 per cent), and ‘other’ anthropogenic items (35 per cent).

It was also discovered that of all the waste found, 89 per cent of it was designed for single-use purposes. This is defined as plastic bags, bottles and packages. The deeper the study looked, the greater the amount of plastic they found. 

Of all man-made items found deeper than 20,000 feet (6,000 metres), the ratios increased to 52 per cent for macro-plastic and 92 per cent for single-use plastic.

The direct damage this caused to the ecosystem and environment is clear to see as deep-sea organisms were observed in the 17 per cent of plastic debris images taken by the study.

 

 

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