Bangor University student found dead in room at halls of residence

Bangor University student, 26, dies in his room at halls of residence despite friends’ desperate attempts to save him

  • North Wales Police said officers and paramedics were called to halls on Sunday
  • Friends and paramedics had tried to revive him but sadly he died at the scene
  • The 26-year-old is at least ninth student to have died since universities returned
  • Death came as Wales entered strict lockdown requiring people to stay at home

A Bangor University student has been found dead at a halls of residence, becoming the ninth UK student to have died in less than a month.

North Wales Police confirmed that officers and paramedics were called to a student’s room on Sunday evening, before a 26-year-old man was pronounced dead.

His death is not being treated as suspicious, the force said. 

A spokesman said: ‘Shortly after 10pm on October 25, North Wales Police were requested by the ambulance service to attend at a student’s room at a Bangor University halls of residence.

‘Regrettably, despite the best efforts of friends and paramedics, a 26 year old student year male student was pronounced dead at the location.

‘Our thoughts are with the victim’s family and friends following this tragic death of a young student, and we request that their privacy is respected.

‘The death is not being treated as suspicious and the coroner for North West Wales, Mr Dewi Pritchard Jones has been informed.’  

It comes after a 20-year-old Coventry University student was found dead in a halls of residence on October 16.

A 26-year-old student has been found dead at Bangor University, becoming the ninth student to have died in the last month since universities returned after the summer break


Jeni Larmour (left), 18, of Newcastle University; and Finn Kitson (right), 19, a Manchester University student, are among at least eight university students who have died so far this term

How at least nine students have died since UK universities returned last month

  • September 25: Police find body of University of Bath student Martin Bowers, 20, in the River Avon, after he went missing six days earlier in Bristol
  • September 30: Police find body of University of Bath student Alec Unsgaard who had been missing for 12 days after vanishing while out celebrating his 21st birthday
  • October 3: Jeni Larmour, 18, is found dead at the Richardson Road halls at Newcastle University after allegedly taking ketamine
  • October 4: A Northumbria University student aged 21, who has not been named, is taken ill at his halls in Newcastle after allegedly taking MDMA and later dies in hospital
  • October 4: A second Newcastle University student aged 18, who has not been named, is found dead at the Richardson Road halls after also allegedly taking ketamine
  • October 8: University of Manchester student Finn Kitson, 19, is found dead at the university’s Fallowfield halls of residence
  • October 15: Nottingham Trent University student Hope Starsmore, 20, dies eight days after a car crash in Burgh Le Marsh, Lincolnshire
  • October 16: Coventry University student aged 20 is found dead in the Bishop Gate halls of residence
  • October 25: Bangor University student aged 26 is found dead in halls of residence. 

Meanwhile, Manchester University student Finn Kitson, 19, was found dead in his halls on October 8 after suffering with ‘severe anxiety’, according to his family.

As of Friday 23 October, the number of current Covid positive cases related to University students in the Bangor City area were 2 resident in halls and 17 resident in the Bangor community, and 2 in the wider north Wales community.

It is not thought that Bangor University had put any halls of residence in lockdown, however, Wales has recently entered a firebreak lockdown which requires residents stay at home except for a limited number of exceptions.

These measures came into place on Friday and will remain in place until November 9. 

It is understood the university was providing a ‘blended learning approach’ which involved online teaching and face-to-face tuition where it was safe to do so. 

Among the students at other universities to have been found dead since they returned last month is University of Bath student Martin Bowers, 20, whose body was found in the River Avon on September 25 after he went missing six days earlier in Bristol.

On September 30, police also found the body of his fellow University of Bath student Alec Unsgaard who had been missing for 12 days after vanishing while out celebrating his 21st birthday, in a separate incident to that of Mr Bowers.

Then on October 3 and 4, there were three students who died in drugs-related deaths in Newcastle over one weekend, including Jeni Larmour, 18, who was found dead at the Richardson Road halls at Newcastle University after allegedly taking ketamine.

The next day a Northumbria University student aged 21, who was not named, was taken ill at his halls in Newcastle after allegedly taking MDMA and died in hospital.

That same day, a second Newcastle University student aged 18, also not named, was found dead at the Richardson Road halls after also allegedly taking ketamine.

Then on October 8, Manchester student Mr Kitson was found dead at the university’s Fallowfield halls of residence.

Nottingham Trent University student Hope Starsmore, 20, died last Thursday, eight days after a car crash in Burgh Le Marsh, Lincolnshire


The bodies of University of Bath students Alec Unsgaard (left), 21, and Martin Bowers (right), 20, were both found last month after they went missing in separate incidents

Mr Kitson’s father, Cambridge academic Michael Kitson, 61, later hit out at the ‘little support’ students have been receiving while locked down in their halls. 

And on October 15, Nottingham Trent University student Hope Starsmore, 20, died eight days after a car crash in the Lincolnshire town of Burgh Le Marsh.

Bangor University has been contacted for comment. 

For confidential support call the Samaritans on 116123, visit a local branch or go to www.samaritans.org   

Source: Read Full Article