David Cameron wondered how Bercow would ‘make my life hell today’

David Cameron says he woke up daily wondering what Commons Speaker John Bercow would do ‘to make my life hell today’

  • David Cameron said he was left ‘scratching his head’ by John Bercow’s rulings
  • He also praised Mr Bercow for having the tendency to ’empower’ backbenchers
  • Mr Bercow announced his resignation as Commons Speaker earlier this month 

David Cameron has said he woke up daily wondering what John Bercow would do ‘to make my life hell today’.

The former prime minister did offer some praise for the outgoing and controversial Commons Speaker for having the tendency to ’empower’ backbenchers during his finest moments.

But Mr Cameron told LBC’s Nick Ferrari that he was at times baffled by Mr Bercow’s actions.

He said: ‘Now, the Speaker’s not there to be nice to the Prime Minister, of course. But there were times when things were done which had never been done before. 

‘You scratched your head and thought, hold on, where the hell did that one come from?

David Cameron has said he woke up daily wondering what Commons Speaker John Bercow (pictured) would do ‘to make my life hell today’

‘I almost, sort of, got out of bed every morning and thought, whatever John Bercow, whatever the Speaker can do to make my life hell today, he will do.’ 

Mr Bercow, who announced his departure earlier this month, has come under repeated attack from Brexiteers in recent months. 

But in 2013 he drew Mr Cameron’s ire when he allowed an amendment to the Queen’s Speech calling for an EU referendum bill. 

‘Odd now that he’s such an opponent of it,’ Mr Cameron told LBC. 

‘So, you know, he was elected by MPs, you’ve got to deal with what you’ve got,’ the former Prime Minister went on.  

David Cameron said in an LBC interview (pictured) that he was baffled by some of Mr Bercow’s rulings as Commons Speaker 

Mr Bercow entered Parliament in 1997 and held several shadow ministerial positions before taking the Speaker’s chair. 

Despite being a Conservative, he was elected Speaker in 2009 mainly as a result of backing from Labour.  

He promised to serve ‘no more than nine years in total’ but abandoned that commitment ahead of the 2017 snap election.

Allegations of bullying by former members of his staff, denied by the Speaker, led to fresh calls for him to quit.

This year he has come under fire for a series of controversial rulings which were widely thought to favour Remainers.  

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