Internet goes crazy over a ‘salmon cannon’ that shoots fish over a dam

The ‘salmon cannon’ that shoots fish over a dam at 22mph to reach their spawning grounds

  • The ‘salmon cannon’ created by Whooshh Industries transports salmon over treacherous waters in a matter of seconds 
  • The innovation is crucial for helping salmon get upstream to spawning grounds
  • So far, 20 of the contraption have been sold to US and European agencies
  • While the internet had a lot of jokes, CEO Vince Bryant has said the cannon is a safer option that traditional methods and it’s a a comfortable ride for the fish

Video of a cannon that propels salmon over dams and other impassible water has taken the internet by storm.

The ‘salmon cannon’ created by Whooshh Innovations helps the fish, which travel upstream to spawn, make it through tricky patches that would otherwise take days, if they could be passed at all, in a matter of seconds.

The first cannon was sold in 2014, but a video montage created and recently published by Cheddar has now put it on the map.  

‘It’s sort of been outrageous how long this has taken to catch on.’ Whooshh Innovations CEO Vince Bryant told CNN.

The video shows workers placing salmon in the cannon by hand using an old iteration of the design, but now the fish can swim into the cannon all on their own, Bryant said.  

They are then misted with water so that they can breathe on the quick trip. Traveling at an average speed of 22 miles per hour, the fish are back in the water where they belong within a matter of seconds.

Poking fun at the elaborate design, Twitter user @ArcSocio9154644 wrote: ‘Sounds like something Wile E. Coyote built.’  

Video of a cannon created by Whooshh Industries that propels salmon over dams and other impassible water has taken the internet by storm, prompting jokes about whether the fish actually like this idea, and others wanting to get in on the ride, themselves

After entering the cannon, the salmon are misted with water so that they can breathe on the quick trip. Traveling at an average speed of 22 miles per hour, the fish are back in the water where they belong within a matter of seconds. An aerial view of a portion of a salmon cannon is shown

Poking fun at the elaborate design, Twitter user @ArcSocio9154644 wrote: ‘Sounds like something Wile E. Coyote built’

The cannon is capable of transporting 50,000 fish each day. A Twitter user listed as ‘Aubrey Bear’ chimed in: ‘None of their fish friends are going to believe they did this’

The cannon is capable of transporting 50,000 fish each day. 

A Twitter user listed as ‘Aubrey Bear’ chimed in: ‘None of their fish friends are going to believe they did this.’ 

Lots of people online expressed concern for the fish, however, after watching the video.

A Twitter user identified as Matt wrote sarcastically tweeted: ‘Lol doesn’t seem traumatic at all.’ 

A salmon is shown entering into the salmon cannon created by Whooshh Industries

A salmon is shown being transported through the salmon cannon on its way to safe water

A Twitter user identified as Matt wrote sarcastically tweeted: ‘Lol doesn’t seem traumatic at all’

Other thoughts the ride looked like a good time, and wanted to get in on the action. Twitter user @avgpoliticaljoe said: ‘Y’all got one for people? Asking for a friend who may or may not have been drinking’

Other thoughts the ride looked like a good time, and wanted to get in on the action.

Twitter user @avgpoliticaljoe said: ‘Y’all got one for people? Asking for a friend who may or may not have been drinking.’

Twitter user Mia Marie wondered: ‘What if the fish are claustrophobic [sad face emoji]’

A Twitter user identified as ‘Jimmy D’ replied: ‘If they weren’t before, I bet they are now.’ 

Mia Marie joked back: ‘IM claustrophobic now.’ 

Twitter user Mia Marie wondered: ‘What if the fish are claustrophobic [sad face emoji]’ A Twitter user identified as ‘Jimmy D’ replied: ‘If they weren’t before, I bet they are now’

Mia Marie joked back: ‘IM claustrophobic now.’ But according to Whooshh Industries CEO Vince Bryant, claustrophobia, which is the extreme or irrational fear of confined places, should not be an issue. Once the fish enter the tube that will carry them to their final destination, the flexible material expands to their size

According to Bryant, claustrophobia, which is the extreme or irrational fear of confined places, should not be an issue.

Once the fish enter the tube that will carry them to their final destination, the flexible material expands to their size. 

But people still remained skeptical. Verified Twitter user Alanah Pearce wrote: ‘Do the fish… want this?’ 

Twitter user Ann Cal said: ‘It was done in Oregon because of a land disaster and there were no way the fish would be able to make it up stream. So it’s their death or the tube. Think the fish would want the tube!’ 

People remained skeptical. Verified Twitter user Alanah Pearce wrote: ‘Do the fish… want this?’

Twitter user Ann Cal said: ‘It was done in Oregon because of a land disaster and there were no way the fish would be able to make it up stream. So it’s their death or the tube. Think the fish would want the tube!’

Bryant said any concern for the fish is unfounded. ‘There’s no stress for the fish,’ he said. ‘It should be a comfortable ride for them.’

He noted that his system is a lot more friendly to the fish than other methods of helping them get to their spawning grounds, like traditional fish ladders which require the salmon to jump up ‘rungs’ to get upstream.

Byrant said a study from April by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found salmon that passed through the cannon sustained fewer injuries than those who were enabled to travel by other means. 

Whooshh Industries has already sold 20 of its salmon cannon contraptions, with its longest yet spanning 1,700 feet (which is more than a quarter of a mile), Bryant said.

Buyers have included government agencies across the US and Europe.  

‘People think it’s crazy,’ Byrant said. ‘This is the real deal, guys. This is not some internet video thing.’

The first cannon was sold in 2014. Whooshh Industries has already sold 20 of its salmon cannon contraptions, with its longest yet spanning 1,700 feet (which is more than a quarter of a mile), Bryant said

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