The Victoria line turns 50 today

The Victoria line at 50: Incredible photos show the Queen on the underground after new line opened in 1968 as it celebrates half a century of running today

  •  Victoria line turns 50 today, Transport for London has released some historic photos to mark the occasion
  • When the line opened in 1968, it ran from Walthamstow Central to Highbury & Islington later extending south
  • Today, the Victoria line is the most frequent train service in the UK, and the second most frequent in the world, and operates 36 trains per hour at the busiest times

Yesterday it was announced the Elizabeth line is facing further delays, and is now set to open in autumn 2019, £600m over budget and nine months late.

But as the line named after one long reigning queen is opening, another is celebrating a major anniversary.

London’s Victoria line turns 50 today, and Transport for London has released some historic photos to mark the occasion.

When the line opened in 1968, it ran from Walthamstow Central to Highbury & Islington and was the first new line in 61 years – before that was the Central line in 1907. 

Queen Elizabeth II opens the new Victoria Line on the London Underground

London’s Victoria line turns 50 today, and Transport for London has released some historic photos to mark the occasion

But Crossrail isn’t alone in facing issues that pushed opening back.

Just 24 hours before the Victoria line was due to open, newspapers reported dampness affecting signalling equipment needed to be retested.

George Follenfant, London Transport’s chief civil engineer, was quoted said ‘I think it will be ready on time’, and he was right first passenger took the 5.7mile journey on September 1, 1968.

Workmen tend to the still escalators far below ground in London on July 7, 1969

An access tunnel under Oxford Circus used to extract clay from excavations during the construction of the Victoria Line on the London Underground system, April 23 1964

Queen Elizabeth II opens the new branch of the Victoria Line on the London Underground,  March 7 1969

A tube worker being lowered into a tunnelling shaft in Cavendish Square during work on London Underground’s Victoria Line

The line was extended south in the following two years and was completed at Pimlico in 1972, it was approved by Parliament in 1955. 

By 1966, most of the tunnels had been finished, and the first stations opened in 1968, later extending as far south as Brixton. 

The official opening of Victoria Tube station was on March 7, 1969, when Queen Elizabeth II unveiled a commemorative plaque. 


  • ‘I’m not crossrail… I’m disappointed-rail’: Long-suffering…


    Would YOU wear a ‘baby on board’ badge at six weeks…


    Transport For London worker who promoted Boris Johnson…

Share this article

She then took the Victoria line to Green Park, becoming the only reigning monarch to ever use the Tube. 

Today, the Victoria line is the most frequent train service in the UK, and the second most frequent in the world, and operates 36 trains per hour at the busiest times, with 100 seconds between trains. It is only beaten by the Moscow Metro which runs trains every 95 seconds.

This means that more than 250 million passengers each year are served by the train. 


Queen Elizabeth II opens the new Victoria Line on the London Underground, March 7, 1979 (left). Right: The Queen’s Cousin, Princess Alexandra, The Honourable Lady Ogilvy going down the escalator at Brixton station after she officially opened the new Victoria Line extension in 1971

July 23 1971: The Queen’s cousin, Princess Alexandra travelling in the driver’s cab after she had officially opened the extension of the Victoria line to Brixton

The Queen travelling on the London Underground after officially opening the Victoria Line service, making her the first monarch to ever ride the tube

Workmen boring a 21ft diameter tunnel linked the Victoria line with the Bakerloo line at Oxford Circus station

In 2016, the Night Tube opened on the Victoria Line providing a quick and affordable way to travel across London during weekend nights. 

The anniversary coincides with the completion of works at Blackhorse Road station, which serves 15 million customer journeys every year.

Frank Ibe, Head of Line Operations for the Victoria line said: ‘The Victoria line has been a key part of London’s transport network for 50 years and it’s amazing to think how many billions of journeys have been made in its history. When it opened, the Victoria line was one of the most modern subways in the world and, thanks to the recent improvements, it still sets the standard for the rest of the world today.’

Prince Philip visits London Underground: The Duke Of Edinburgh looks at the South Tunnel facing on the Victoria Line works at Vauxhall Park in 1968

Bruce Horncastle who worked as on the construction of the new Victoria Line

Elevated view looking onto the rail tracks leading to the Northumberland Park depot for the newly completed London underground train service Victoria Line on 30 August 1968

David Lammy, MP for Tottenham, said: ‘The Victoria line has served as the beating vein between Tottenham, Haringey and the rest of London, ever since it opened 50 years ago. Throughout my life, it has allowed the people of our constituency to access work, education and culture across the capital. With the recent modernisation and the improvements still being made, I look forward to the Victoria line benefitting people in my constituency and across London for years to come.’

Leader of Waltham Forest Council, Clare Coghill said: ‘We’d like to wish the Victoria line a very happy 50th birthday! The Victoria line has been instrumental in connecting Waltham Forest to central London. It has helped millions of residents get to work, helped local businesses thrive and opened the borough up to visitors from London and further afield. Next year it will be play a key role in helping Londoners visit us for the first Borough of Culture celebrations. We look forward to the next 50 years and beyond!’

‘I’m not crossrail… I’m disappointed-rail’: Long-suffering commuters despair as London’s new £15bn Elizabeth line will NOT open by December leaving passengers waiting until Autumn 2019

  • Surprise announcement angers businesses coming just three months before the Christmas trading period
  • Angry and ‘gutted’ commuters have been taking to Twitter to express their frustration with the recent news
  • Project has already gone over budget by £600m rising from £14.8bn to £15.4bn – now extra funding is needed
  • Full Elizabeth line will include journey from Reading to Shenfield in Essex, and from Heathrow to Abbey Wood
  • Transport for London would not confirm to MailOnline whether this would be the final delay to the project 

 By James Wood for MailOnline  

Infuriated passengers have spoken out following the shock announcement Crossrail is to be delayed by nine months – now with just a vague autumn opening date next year.

The delay has caused much ‘frustration’ among passengers and business owners alike with one irate commuter labelling himself ‘not Crossrail’ but ‘disappointed rail.’

The colossal project had been expected to open in December this year bringing significantly reduced journey times to the capital – but the need for ‘further testing’ has led to the delay.

London’s new east-west railway service site at Farringdon on the day it was announced Crossrail would be delayed until Autumn – missing its scheduled December opening 

Irate commuters have been taking to Twitter to share their frustration, with one user called Mark Button describing the situation as ‘bad news, no doubt’.

While Steve Merrylees said: ‘I know I’m a transport nerd but I’m gutted about Crossrail being delayed. It’s going to cause a lot of problems for TfL .’

London’s new east-west railway service site at Farringdon on the day it was announced Crossrail would be delayed until Autumn – missing its scheduled December opening

An Elizabeth line train at Abbeywood train station in London as hundreds of angry commuters deal with the news Crossrail will be delayed by nine months

An Elizabeth line train at Abbeywood train station in London as hundreds of angry commuters deal with the news Crossrail will be delayed by nine months

Commuters walk alongside London’s new east-west railway service site at Farringdon today as Crossrail have announced they will miss the December opening date and services will be delayed until Autumn

The Crossrail line had been due to open in December of this year but the need for ‘further testing’ has meant it will now not open until autumn next year

A map of the new Elizabeth line which will take commuters from Reading and Heathrow Airport in the west to Shenfield and Abbey Wood in the east. Angry commuters have been taking to Twitter (below) to share their thoughts following news of the delay

Commuters walk alongside London’s new east-west railway service site at Farringdon today as Crossrail have announced they will miss the December opening date and services will be delayed until Autumn

Another user, called Jeff, questioned whether this was ‘more evidence of a nation in crisis’.

While Elliot Howells, who has bought a home along the new line, said: ‘Simply not good enough and hugely disappointing from TfL.

‘I bought a property on the line on the promise of the Elizabeth Line’s December opening. I appreciate the complexity of the project but to announce this a few short months before the expected opening is poor’

The news has caused particular concern among business leaders due to the fact the Christmas trading period is just three months away.

The Crossrail line had been due to open in December of this year but the need for ‘further testing’ has meant it will now not open until autumn next year

Jace Tyrrell, the chief executive of the New West End Company – a group that represents hundreds of businesses in London – said the decision would put greater pressure on retailers.

He said: ‘We are disappointed that the opening of this major and vital piece of infrastructure is being delayed’.

Although touching upon the need for the line to be safe, he said: ‘Retailers throughout the UK are facing difficult trading conditions with rising costs, changing shop habits and falling consumer spending, partly because of Brexit uncertainties.

more videos

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3

    • Watch video

      Moment pool delivery ends up in an ABSOLUTE DISASTER in Minnesota


    • Watch video

      Alex Salmond resigns from SNP amid harassment claims storm


    • Watch video

      Moment dozens of migrants storm Spanish beach from small boat


    • Watch video

      Dominic Raab admits October Brexit deadline ‘may creep forward’


    • Watch video

      English and French fishermen clash in the Channel over scallop stock


    • Watch video

      Road rage results in tractor-trailer flipping over on the highway


    • Watch video

      Heartwarming moment puppy comforts his ill sister at the vets


    • Watch video

      Moment woman dumps rubbish on neighbours’ driveway in Streatham


    • Watch video

      PM continues her tour of Africa with some new dance moves


    • Watch video

      Tense moment cyclist is nearly crushed by lorry on busy London road


    • Watch video

      Bishop Charles Ellis holds Ariana Grande tight in awkward exchange


    • Watch video

      Ariana Grande and other celebrities sing at Aretha’s funeral

    ‘The delay increases the urgency for the Government to introduce measures to support Britain’s retailers and high streets.’

    General view of construction during the Crossrail breakthrough beneath Finsbury Circus. Thousands of construction workers have been involved in the project since its inception

    An artist’s impression of how stations might look on the Elizabeth line once open to the public. Londoners will have to wait a little longer for the futuristic stations, as the line has now been delayed

    A map showing the new route of the Crossrail project, which has now been delayed until autumn next year. It will take commuters from Reading and Heathrow in the west to Shenfield and Abbey Wood in the east

    A map of the new Elizabeth line which will take commuters from Reading and Heathrow Airport in the west to Shenfield and Abbey Wood in the east. Angry commuters have been taking to Twitter (below) to share their thoughts following news of the delay

    He urged the government to cut business rates and called for an interim tax of just one per cent for online businesses.

    Conservative transport secretary Chris Grayling has been called out following news of the delay, while Mayor of London Sadiq Khan labelled the news ‘disappointing’.

    Andy McDonald, the shadow transport secretary, wrote on Twitter: ‘Yet again an announcement is made while Parliament is in recess, allowing the Transport Secretary to avoid scrutiny.

    ‘He should be explaining how the Crossrail delay happened and what he plans to do about it – but he has gone missing.’

    more videos

    • 1
    • 2
    • 3

      • Watch video

        Moment pool delivery ends up in an ABSOLUTE DISASTER in Minnesota


      • Watch video

        Alex Salmond resigns from SNP amid harassment claims storm


      • Watch video

        Moment dozens of migrants storm Spanish beach from small boat


      • Watch video

        Dominic Raab admits October Brexit deadline ‘may creep forward’


      • Watch video

        English and French fishermen clash in the Channel over scallop stock


      • Watch video

        Road rage results in tractor-trailer flipping over on the highway


      • Watch video

        Heartwarming moment puppy comforts his ill sister at the vets


      • Watch video

        Moment woman dumps rubbish on neighbours’ driveway in Streatham


      • Watch video

        PM continues her tour of Africa with some new dance moves


      • Watch video

        Tense moment cyclist is nearly crushed by lorry on busy London road


      • Watch video

        Bishop Charles Ellis holds Ariana Grande tight in awkward exchange


      • Watch video

        Ariana Grande and other celebrities sing at Aretha’s funeral

      MailOnline contacted TfL to see if this would be the last delay the project would face – but a spokesman for the organisation refused to rule out the possibility .

      The spokesman also refused to confirm whether this delay would impact on stations at the terminus ends of the line – meaning passengers getting on trains in Berkshire may also have to wait.

      Transport for London (TfL) has expressed ‘ disappointment ‘ following the news but stressed that a safe and reliable line is of ‘ paramount importance’.

      Addressing the delay, a spokesman for Crossrail Limited said: ‘The revised schedule is needed to complete the final infrastructure and extensive testing required to ensure the Elizabeth line opens as a safe and reliable railway.’

      General view of construction during the Crossrail breakthrough beneath Finsbury Circus. Thousands of construction workers have been involved in the project since its inception

      When contacted for more information by Mail Online, a spokesman for TfL said: ‘As you can imagine it is a very big project which has been going on for ten years and so there is no one reason for the delay.

      ‘We don’t think the December opening date was ambitious. We need more time for testing – more work is needed on checking the signalling and software.’

      Testing is needed to introduce the next phase of the railway – the central section between Paddington and Abbey Wood – in a way that can be guaranteed to be safe and reliable.

      The latest setback comes soon after it was announced by a rail minister that the project had already gone £600m over budget.

      An artist’s impression of how stations might look on the Elizabeth line once open to the public. Londoners will have to wait a little longer for the futuristic stations, as the line has now been delayed 

      Jo Johnson, in his annual update on the project, said that the schemes budget had increased from £14.8bn to £15.4bn.

      He blamed ‘cost pressures’ but said that additional funds would be provided by the Department for Transport and Transport for London.

      The hugely complex ten-year project is bringing together multiple infrastructure contracts, new trains and three different signalling systems.

      The Elizabeth line will add 10 per cent to central London’s rail capacity, and the project is estimated to boost the economy by an estimated £42bn.

      A map showing the new route of the Crossrail project, which has now been delayed until autumn next year. It will take commuters from Reading and Heathrow in the west to Shenfield and Abbey Wood in the east

      Once open it will allow journeys between Reading in the east and Shenfield in the west – all the way to Essex.

      Another journey could take people from Heathrow Airport in the east to Abbey Wood in the west.

      The autumn opening will only see the central section of the Elizabeth line open.

      When asked by MailOnline how long it would take the full line to open, a spokesman for TfL said: ‘We are still aiming to open the full Elizabeth line from Reading and Heathrow to Shenfield and Abbey Wood as soon as possible after the opening of the central section next autumn.’

      more videos

      • 1
      • 2
      • 3

        • Watch video

          Moment pool delivery ends up in an ABSOLUTE DISASTER in Minnesota


        • Watch video

          Alex Salmond resigns from SNP amid harassment claims storm


        • Watch video

          Moment dozens of migrants storm Spanish beach from small boat


        • Watch video

          Dominic Raab admits October Brexit deadline ‘may creep forward’


        • Watch video

          English and French fishermen clash in the Channel over scallop stock


        • Watch video

          Road rage results in tractor-trailer flipping over on the highway


        • Watch video

          Heartwarming moment puppy comforts his ill sister at the vets


        • Watch video

          Moment woman dumps rubbish on neighbours’ driveway in Streatham


        • Watch video

          PM continues her tour of Africa with some new dance moves


        • Watch video

          Tense moment cyclist is nearly crushed by lorry on busy London road


        • Watch video

          Bishop Charles Ellis holds Ariana Grande tight in awkward exchange


        • Watch video

          Ariana Grande and other celebrities sing at Aretha’s funeral

        The passenger thoroughfare at Farringdon Crossrail station will see thousands of commuters pass through it every day once open

        A major passenger thoroughfare is seen as work continues at the Farringdon Crossrail station. The Elizabeth line was expected to open in December 2018 but it has now been announced that it will not until autumn 2019

        Addressing the reasons behind the closure, the spokesman for Crossrail Limited said: ‘The original programme for testing has been compressed by more time being needed by contractors to complete fit-out activity in the central tunnels and the development of railway systems software.

        ‘Testing has started but further time is required to complete the full range of integrated tests.’

        Crossrail in numbers: How journey times will be slashed across London and economy will be boosted by £42billion

        The new railway will become known as the Elizabeth line when it opens in autumn 2019.

        Not only will it significantly slash journey times across the capital, it is expected to boost house prices, and welcome 200million passengers each year. 

        • At its peak, a massive 10,000-strong workforce was responsible for completing the project, which included more than 700 apprentices.
        • The Crossrail project is building 10 brand new stations at locations including Abbey Wood, Bond Street, Canary Wharf, Customs House, Farringdon, Liverpool Street, Paddington, Tottenham Court Road, Whitechapel and Woolwich.
        • Over three million tonnes of excavated material from the tunnels was shipped to Wallasea Island in Essex to create a new 1,500 acre RSPB nature reserve. 
        • The construction of the new railway is expected to add an estimated £42bn to the UK economy.
        • Residential capital values are projected to increase immediately around Crossrail stations in central London by 25 per cent, and by 20 per cent in suburbs.
        • House prices in Reading, on the western tip of the Elizabeth line, are expected to grow by a whopping 50 per cent.
        • In March 2013, workers digging the tunnels for Crossrail uncovered 13 skeletons under a road near Charterhouse Square, Farringdon. The bodies were believed to be 14th Century plague victims.
        • Elsewhere 3,500 skeletons were excavated at the Crossrail project Liverpool Street site from the Bedlam burial ground by MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) between February and August 2015.
        • Up to 100 archaeologists have also worked on the project, uncovering thousands of items and artefacts spanning 55million years of London’s history.

        Crossrail workers in a train tunnel at the construction site of the Paddington Crossrail station, in central London. At its peak, a massive 10,000-strong workforce was responsible for completing the project

        Passenger escalators are seen in an entrance hall as work is carried out at the Farringdon Crossrail station. More than 700 apprentices were also involved in the project

        An artist’s impression of the trains that will run on the Crossrail project when it opens in the autumn of next year. More work needs to be completed on the Reading station before it opens to the public

        An artist’s impression of how the new trains will look once fully operational. The line was originally scheduled to open in December of this year, but further testing is now required on the line

        The new Elizabeth line will take commuters from Reading in the west all the way to Shenfield, Essex in the east. Here is how trains on the new line might look

        The focus remains on opening the full Elizabeth line, from Reading and Heathrow in the west to Shenfield and Abbey Wood in the east, as soon after the central tunnels open as possible.

        Simon Wright, Crossrail Chief Executive said: ‘The Elizabeth line is one of the most complex and challenging infrastructure projects ever undertaken in the UK and is now in its final stages.

        ‘We have made huge progress with the delivery of this incredible project but we need further time to complete the testing of the new railway.

        ‘We are working around the clock with our supply chain and Transport for London to complete and commission the Elizabeth line.’

        Relief: An artist’s impression of the scene at the new Whitechapel station, which is will operate the new Crossrail service

        Futuristic: The new designs, such as this one at Liverpool Street, emphasise airy spaces and lots of light

        New: A design of the station concourse being built on top of the existing Overground line at Whitechapel station

        The new Elizabeth line trains are already operating between Shenfield and Liverpool Street and between Paddington and Hayes & Harlington, in readiness for the full opening.

        The trains are also being tested in the Heathrow tunnels.

        Crossrail workers in a train tunnel at the construction site of the Paddington Crossrail station, in central London. At its peak, a massive 10,000-strong workforce was responsible for completing the project

        The Crossrail station under construction at Tottenham Court Road – this will also see thousands of commuters pass through once open

        Construction activity is drawing to a close including the completion of the remaining architectural fit-out in the new central section stations.

        The new railway, jointly sponsored by the Department for Transport and Transport for London with support from London’s business community, will connect stations such as Paddington to Canary Wharf in only 17 minutes.

        Crossrail is one of the biggest engineering projects ever undertaken in the UK. The new railway will become known as the Elizabeth line when it opens in 2019

        A major passenger thoroughfare is seen as work continues at the Farringdon Crossrail station. The Elizabeth line was expected to open in December 2018 but it has now been announced that it will not until autumn 2019

        Crossrail is one of the biggest engineering projects ever undertaken in the UK. The new railway will become known as the Elizabeth line when it opens in 2019

        Passenger escalators are seen in an entrance hall as work is carried out at the Farringdon Crossrail station. More than 700 apprentices were also involved in the project 

        The passenger thoroughfare at Farringdon Crossrail station will see thousands of commuters pass through it every day once open

        The Crossrail station under construction at Tottenham Court Road – this will also see thousands of commuters pass through once open

        The line got its name in 2016 when London Mayor Boris Johnson announced it would be named after the Queen – who was visiting the construction site at Bond Street station that day.

        On the day of the announcement she unveiled the purple Elizabeth line logo which will feature across the network, in an Angela Kelly lilac wool crepe dress with matching coat and hat for the occasion.

        An artist’s impression of how the new trains will look once fully operational. The line was originally scheduled to open in December of this year, but further testing is now required on the line

        more videos

        • 1
        • 2
        • 3

          • Watch video

            Moment pool delivery ends up in an ABSOLUTE DISASTER in Minnesota


          • Watch video

            Alex Salmond resigns from SNP amid harassment claims storm


          • Watch video

            Moment dozens of migrants storm Spanish beach from small boat


          • Watch video

            Dominic Raab admits October Brexit deadline ‘may creep forward’


          • Watch video

            English and French fishermen clash in the Channel over scallop stock


          • Watch video

            Road rage results in tractor-trailer flipping over on the highway


          • Watch video

            Heartwarming moment puppy comforts his ill sister at the vets


          • Watch video

            Moment woman dumps rubbish on neighbours’ driveway in Streatham


          • Watch video

            PM continues her tour of Africa with some new dance moves


          • Watch video

            Tense moment cyclist is nearly crushed by lorry on busy London road


          • Watch video

            Bishop Charles Ellis holds Ariana Grande tight in awkward exchange


          • Watch video

            Ariana Grande and other celebrities sing at Aretha’s funeral

          After greeting representatives, she was taken in an industrial lift to the site 92ft below ground, where she viewed part of the railway tunnel and met construction apprentices dressed in bright orange jackets and trousers.

          The new line was named after the Queen (pictured) in 2016 with Boris Johnson, the then Mayor of London, making the announcement at Bond Street station

          The Queen became the first reigning monarch to travel on the London Underground in 1969 when she opened the Victoria line.

          In 1977 the Jubilee line was opened by the Prince of Wales and was named to mark 25 years since the Queen’s accession to the throne.

          The new line was named after the Queen (pictured) in 2016 with Boris Johnson, the then Mayor of London, making the announcement at Bond Street station

          The complete history of Crossrail: How project was first envisioned in 1880… to be built nearly 100 years later

          1880  The idea for a scheme like this actually began more than one hundred years ago, with a company called the Regents Canal & Railway Company which lobbied for permission to build a railway that would link Paddington with London’s docks. 

          1943 The idea resurfaced over fifty years later in 1943. One of the results of this period of contemplation was the Abercrombie Plan. Although much of the Abercrombie Plan ultimately came to pass the new Tube lines did not.

          1974 The idea was not forgotten as London continued to grow and flourish. In the 1974 London Rail Study, published by the then Greater London Council and Department for Environment, the line finally got a name – Crossrail.

          Unfortunately, the study estimated the cost of such a scheme at £300m, and thus although it recommended feasibility studies be undertaken as a priority, it could do little more. 

          1980 In 1980 that time almost came – a British Rail discussion paper, published that year, proposed an Inter City link across London featuring three route options and costed at £330m.   

          Although the 1980 discussion paper ultimately led to nothing, the looming threat of Underground congestion that both it and the 1974 study had highlighted continued to develop.  

          1989  The government commissioned and published the Central London Rail Study in 1989 – a report which took many of the schemes highlighted in the 1974 study and developed them into more concrete schemes.

          1990 In October 1990 the government finally gave the go-ahead to British Rail and London Transport to develop the east-west Crossrail scheme 

          In November 1991, a private bill was submitted to Parliament. The cost of the Crossrail scheme was given as just over £2bn at 1993 prices

          The onset of the recession in the early 1990s, combined with the increased constraints on public finances, proved key factors that lead to Parliament rejecting the Bill in May 1994.

          1994 In July 1994 it was announced that the Crossrail project would be pushed forward under the Transport and Works Act (TWA) system, which had replaced private bills as the procedure by which large infrastructure projects could be brought about.

          Before the draft order was lodged, however, the Government commissioned a further study to determine whether any smaller scale alternatives could achieve the same benefits as Crossrail. 

          2000  Cross London Rail Links Ltd (CLRL), jointly owned by the SRA and Transport for London (TfL), was set up to undertake project definition work on a Crossrail link and a feasibility study of a possible Hackney-southwest London scheme. CLRL’s initial budget was set at £154 million and the company was launched in January 2002. 

           2005 A Crossrail Hybrid Bill was presented to Parliament in February 2005 and the principle of the scheme was established at the second reading debate in July.

          2008  The Crossrail Act finally gave Crossrail a confirmed route.

          2009 After 35 years of planning and development, Crossrail finally broke ground on 15 May 2009 at Canary Wharf, when the Mayor and the then Transport Secretary Lord Adonis launched the first pile into the North Dock in Docklands at the site of the new Canary Wharf station. 

          2012 Crossrail tunnelling began in May 2012 and ended at Farringdon in May 2015 with the break through of tunnelling machine Victoria. 

          Eight 1,000 tonne tunnelling machines have bored 26 miles or 42 km of new 6.2m diameter rail tunnels under London. 

          2018 All of the permanent track was installed and the new Elizabeth line trains were being tested using the line’s new automatic train control system which operates in the central section of the route.

          The line was due to open in December but has been delayed for further testing to be carried out.  

          2019  Crossrail is due to open in the Autumn. 

          Source: Crossrail 

           

           

          Source: Read Full Article