Workers to choose their OWN PAY and hours in Labour's radical new flexible scheme

WORKERS will choose their own pay and hours as party of a madcap scheme by Labour.

Jereym Corbyn wants to force companies to make all posts flexi-time, meaning staff can choose when to arrive at and leave work.

LABOUR'S NOT WORKING

The plan was announced by Shadow Equalities Secretary Dawn Butler as part of a drive to improve working conditions for women.

Separately it emerged Shadow Employment Secretary Laura Pidcock told a Labourlist event that workers should get to set their own pay based on what they think they’re worth.

But business chiefs have slammed the plans as "unaffordable" and warned they could wreck the economy.

The radical proposals would create bureaucracy and could put companies off hiring, leading industry figures said.

Business Secretary Andrea Leasom said: “A vote for Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour is a vote to put businesses and jobs at risk.

“Their reckless plans would cripple businesses across the country, leaving hardworking people to pay the price.”

Their reckless plans would cripple businesses across the country, leaving hardworking people to pay the price.

 

Alison Cork, founder of female entrepreneurs network Make it Your Business, said: “Letting workers choose their own hours is simply not a credible policy.

“It would be crippling for many businesses and totally impractical for frontline workers in industries like the Royal Mail or in hospitals.

“The Labour Party should focus on creating certainty for businesses, not on setting nonsensical rules that would hit small businesses the hardest.”

'UNAFFORDABLE' PLANS

The policies were also panned by business groups who said they would be “ineffective and unaffordable” and could deter small firms from recruiting.

Matthew Percival from the CBI said: “Needing government approval to set working patterns and company diversity action plans are bureaucratic to the point of being ineffective and unaffordable.

Needing government approval to set working patterns and company diversity action plans are bureaucratic to the point of being ineffective and unaffordable.

“They are the wrong answers to the right questions. The next government should work with business to develop policies that tackle gender inequality in ways that work for everyone.”

Federation of Small Businesses chairman Mike Cherry added: “Small firms should not have every employment decision they take vetted by Whitehall.

"The danger is these policies succeed in creating nothing but paperwork.

“We expect flexible working to increase as more people see the benefits and businesses adapt. The key is that many small firms do so informally.

“They don’t have big HR departments to draw on and shouldn’t be put off hiring by bureaucracy.”


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