Hollyoaks' Jessamy Stoddart is ENGAGED to boyfriend Ryan O'Gorman

‘A thousand times yes!’: Hollyoaks star Jessamy Stoddart is ENGAGED to boyfriend Ryan O’Gorman as she flaunts her unique ring

  • Hollyoaks’ actress Jessamy Stoddart has revealed that she is engaged to her longtime beau Ryan O’Gorman
  • The soap star , 27, confirmed her joyful news on Instagram on Monday as she debuted her unique triangular silver engagement ring
  • She looked effortlessly glamorous as she excitedly held her left hand up in front of her mouth to show off her glitzy new jewellery 
  • The bride-to-be was joined by her new fiancé in one snap, which saw her strike a lighthearted pose as she let her ring take centre stage
  • Jessamy excitedly gushed that she said ‘a thousand times yes’ in an accompanying caption while revealing her big news 

Hollyoaks’ actress Jessamy Stoddart has revealed that she is engaged to her longtime beau Ryan O’Gorman.

The soap star, 27, confirmed her joyful news on Instagram on Monday as she debuted her unique triangular silver engagement ring in a set of snaps.

She looked effortlessly glamorous as she excitedly held her left hand up in front of her mouth to show off her glitzy new jewellery.

 

‘A thousand times yes!’: Hollyoaks’ actress Jessamy Stoddart has revealed that she is engaged to her longtime beau Ryan O’Gorman

Jessamy wore her brunette tresses in a straight fashion and let her natural beauty shine through with a low-coverage make-up palette.

The bride-to-be was joined by her new fiancé Ryan in another snap, which saw her strike a lighthearted pose as she let her engagement ring take centre stage.

Jessamy, who plays Liberty Savage in the Channel 4 soap, sported a beige jumper and a black leather jacket, which she accessorised with an elegant gold pendant.

Her longtime boyfriend flashed a huge grin as he stood behind his wife-to-be after popping the big question.

Newly engaged! The soap star, 27, confirmed her joyful news on Instagram on Monday as she debuted her unique triangular silver engagement ring in a set of snaps

The TV star excitedly gushed that she said ‘a thousand times yes’ in an accompanying caption while revealing her big news.

She simply penned: ‘On a scale of 1-10 how engaged do I look? 1000 x yes’

Jessamy’s Hollyoaks’ character Liberty has been the face of a hard-hitting storyline in recent episodes after giving birth to baby Faith.

Liberty develops symptoms of postpartum psychosis and begins having vivid hallucinations of her deceased niece Nico Blake.

Emotional: Jessamy’s Hollyoaks’ character Liberty has been the face of a hard-hitting storyline after developing postpartum psychosis after giving birth to baby Faith

Postpartum psychosis is a serious mental health condition that causes new mothers to experience delusions and hallucinations, affecting around one-to-two in every 1,000 births.

In the soap, Liberty battled her mental health and did a runner with her child after being told to do so by the visions of Nico, played by Persephone Swales-Dawson. 

Her daughter had become extremely unwell but was commanded by Nico not to seek medical help for Faith.

But after assistance from her sister Sienna Blake, played by Anna Passey, she agrees to seek help for her mental health struggles and is admitted to hospital.

Mental health: Liberty (pictured) develops symptoms of postpartum psychosis and begins having vivid hallucinations of her deceased niece Nico Blake

Hollyoaks’ bosses have been working with charity Action on Postpartum Psychosis to ensure the emotional storyline is portrayed as accurately as possible.

A spokesperson for the charity told Digital Spy: ‘We know the power of this condition appearing in one of the UK’s best loved dramas. 

‘The Hollyoaks characters are well known to millions and seeing a realistic depiction of such a misunderstood illness will, we hope, bring the realities of Postpartum Psychosis to a whole new audience who may not have heard of the illness before.’

They added: ‘This work has been led by women who have themselves experienced the illness, to ensure that the story is as sensitive and realistic as possible.’

WHAT IS POSTPARTUM PSYCHOSIS? 

Postpartum psychosis is a serious mental health illness that can cause new mothers to experience hallucinations and delusions.

It affects around one-to-two in every 1,000 births, according to Postpartum Support International.

PP is different from the ‘baby blues’, which many mothers experience while they struggle to cope with the stress and hormonal changes that come with having children.

It is also different from postnatal depression, which affects one in 10 women to some extent. This can cause feelings of helplessness, as well as a loss of interest in the baby and crying frequently. 

PP’s symptoms usually start within the first two weeks. Some include:

  • Manic mood
  • Depression 
  • Loss of inhibitions
  • Feeling paranoid or afraid
  • Restlessness
  • Confusion
  • Acting out of character

Its cause is unclear. Women are thought to be more at risk if they have:

  • A family history of mental illness, particularly PP
  • Bipolar disorder or schizophrenia
  • A traumatic birth or pregnancy
  • Suffered from PP in the past 

Ideally, patients should be put on a specialist psychiatric unit, called a mother and baby unit (MBU), where they can still be with their child. They may be admitted to a general psychiatric ward until a MBU becomes available. 

Antidepressants may be prescribed to ease symptoms, as well as anti-psychotics and mood stabilisers, like lithium. 

Psychological therapy, like cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), may help patients manage how they think and act.

In rare cases, electroconvulsive therapy can help with severe depression or mania.

Most women with PP make a full recovery if treated correctly. 

Severe symptoms tend to last between two and 12 weeks. However, it can take a year or more for women to recover.

A PP episode can be followed by a period of depression, anxiety and low confidence. Some women then struggle to bond with their baby or feel like they missed out.

These feelings can usually be overcome with the help of a mental health support team.

Around half of women who have PP suffer again in future pregnancies.  Those who are at high risk should receive specialist care from a psychiatrist while they are expecting. 

Source: NHS 

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