Three-camera cluster on the new iPhone 11 is triggering trypophobia

‘It’s making me nauseous’: Three-camera cluster on the new iPhone 11 is triggering people’s trypophobia as Twitter users with the fear of small holes say the phones are ‘creepy’

  • Trypophobia is the popular name for a fear of patterns of small, irregular holes
  • While not a recognised disorder, it is believed to affect all of us to some extent 
  • Suffers experience aversion, disgust and even physical symptoms like itching
  • The fear may have arisen to protect us from visible disease or venomous animals

People with a fear of small holes are complaining that the new iPhone 11 Pro design — with its three cameras, torch and microphone hole — is triggering their phobia.

This fear, dubbed ‘trypophobia’, causes disgust in sufferers and is thought may have evolved from an aversion to visible signs of disease or venomous animals.

The rear camera is a prominent new feature of the iPhone Pro models, which were revealed by Apple during an event in Cupertino, California, on September 10.

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People with a fear of small holes are complaining that the new iPhone 11 Pro design — with its three cameras, torch and microphone hole — is triggering their phobia

This fear, dubbed ‘trypophobia’, causes disgust in sufferers and is thought may have evolved from an aversion to visible signs of disease or venomous animals

TRYPOPHOBIA

Trypophobia, sometimes called repetitive pattern phobia, was coined in 2005.

Although it is not officially recognized by some psychologists, thousands of people claim to be fearful of objects with small holes, such as beehives, ant holes and lotus seed heads.

Sufferers have visceral reaction when they see everyday objects and animals with associated patterns, which can reportedly make their skin crawl, hair hurt, and even their stomach turn.

Though it’s typically described as a ‘fear of holes,’ a new study suggests trypophobia may be more of a disgust-based aversion, brought on by clusters of roughly circular shapes.

On Twitter, some users reported being creeped out by the new design.

‘I really can’t deal with these #iPhone 11 mock ups with all the cameras on the back. They look like holes. Clusters of holes,’ wrote Twitter user @ohdulcesss.

‘It’s making me nauseous and I want to  climb out of my skin.’

‘It’s so gross to me,’ she added. 

Some reported more visceral reactions.

‘If any of y’all pull up in a club to take a photo of me with this,’ @bbbrughaaa began.

‘I’d get a trypophobia attach and vomit all over the gaff.’

@Ayshia Armani said she was glad she switched to Huawei, as the previews of the camera design left her ‘itching’.  

Other users, meanwhile, created fake images of iPhones with even more cameras, imaging future models that would cause even more distress.

As a term, trypophobia — sometimes known as ‘repetitive pattern phobia’ — is believed to have been coined in 2005.

Those with the phobia show a dislike of patterns of small holes, which may appear on innocuous objects like strawberries, bubbles and the ends of straws.

Other triggering sights can include bee hives, lotus seed heads, condensation and patterns created by diseased tissues.

On Twitter, some users reported having strong aversions to the new design. ‘I really can’t deal with these #iPhone 11 mock ups with all the cameras on the back. They look like holes. Clusters of holes,’ wrote Twitter user @ohdulcesss

The rear camera is a prominent new feature of the iPhone Pro models, which were revealed by Apple during an event in Cupertino, California, on September 10

As a term, trypophobia — sometimes known as ‘repetitive pattern phobia’ — is believed to have been coined in 2005

People who report having trypophobic responses saw these sights cause such symptoms as nausea, itching, sweating, eye strain and trembling.

The origins of this revulsion may stem from an evolved tendency to avoid visible displays of infectious disease, experts have suggested.

Alternatively, it has been suggested that trypophobic imagery may be similar to the patterning seen on certain venomous animals.

Those with the phobia show an aversion to patterns of small holes, which may appear on innocuous objects like strawberries, bubbles and the ends of straws. Other triggering sights can include bee hives, lotus seed heads and patterns created by diseased tissues

Other users, meanwhile, created fake images of iPhones with even more cameras, imaging future models that would cause even more distress

The origins of this revulsion may stem from an evolved tendency to avoid visible displays of infectious disease, experts have suggested. Alternatively, it has been suggested that trypophobic imagery may be similar to the patterning seen on certain venomous animals

Trypophobia is not officially officially recognised by psychologists, however if the fear it incites is sufficiently excessive and persistent, some have argued that it should be considered until the broad category of specific phobias.

Psychiatrist Juan Carlos Martínez-Aguayo and colleagues have argued that the fear is associated with the presence of generalised anxiety and major depressive disorders.

The phobia can manifest in the form of disgust, fear, or both — with the former reaction believed to be the stronger emotion in sufferers.

It is unclear exactly how common extreme trypophobia might be, however studies have suggested that around 15 per cent of the population may have such fears with women more susceptible.

‘We have all got it, it’s just a matter of degree,’ vision scientist Geoff Cole who has been studying trypophobia told the BBC earlier this year. 

Gaining popular recognition, trypophobia was highlighted in the seventh season of FX’s American Horror Story anthology series, which featured a character with the fear and was advertised using a variety of trypophobic imagery .

Trypophobia is not officially officially recognised by psychologists, however if the fear it incites is sufficiently excessive and persistent, some have argued that it should be considered until the broad category of specific phobias

Psychiatrist Juan Carlos Martínez-Aguayo and colleagues have argued that the fear is associated with the presence of generalised anxiety and major depressive disorders. The phobia can manifest in the form of disgust, fear, or both — with the former reaction believed to be the stronger emotion in sufferers

It is unclear exactly how common extreme trypophobia might be, however studies have suggested that around 15 per cent of the population may have the fear

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