East Village family is trapped in lead-poisoning nightmare

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An East Village family is trapped in a lead-poisoning nightmare — after a monthslong abatement project failed to remove all of the deadly substance from their home, the dad says.

Garvey Rich said workers spent eight months getting rid of the substance from 32 spots at the home after his toddler son tested positive for lead in July 2019 and The Post exposed the family’s travails.

The lengthy removal process finished in July. Then a city Housing Preservation & Development inspector checked the work, performed by a private contractor hired by the landlord, in early August — and found lead still in two places, Rich told The Post on Sunday.

“One inspector said, ‘Well, let me just test for lead while I’m here.’ He tested, and right away, he said, ‘There’s lead there. There’s lead there,’ ” Rich recalled.

Lead was found in the kitchen windowpane and a bump on the living room wall, said Rich, 55, whose son, Aristotle, 2, has suffered from developmental delays.

“It’s an old window frame. They should have just taken it out, knowing that all the window frames had lead,” the dad said.

Then a few weeks later, another HPD inspection suggested there might be more lead in the home’s floor — a place no one bothered to look before, Rich said.

A judge issued an order Friday saying more abatement work must be done, starting Monday and finishing within five days.

Rich said that in addition to the family having to move in with friends during the work, he and his wife are worried sick about Aristotle.

“We might have lead in the floor. Our child is 2,’’ lamented the freelance marketing consultant.

The Post first reported the family’s plight as part of a story on the damning results of an investigation by Big Apple Comptroller Scott Stringer’s office into the city’s failure to hold landlords accountable over lead issues.

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