Hundreds of sex offenders escape serious punishment

Hundreds of sex offenders escape serious punishment and are allowed to apologise to their victims instead

  • ‘Community resolutions’ were used to deal with 431 sex offences last year
  • The settlement means the guilty party must apologise or pay compensation  
  • The crimes included sexual assault, grooming and flashing offences 

Hundreds of sex offenders avoided serious punishment last year after being allowed to apologise to their victims, new figures have revealed.

More than 400 criminals escaped getting a criminal record after the police and Crown Prosecution Service allowed them to receive a ‘community resolution’.

The settlement means that the guilty party must admit responsibility for the offence and either apologise or pay compensation to the victim.

More than 400 criminals escaped getting a criminal record after the police and Crown Prosecution Service allowed them to receive a ‘community resolution’ (file image) 

This method was meant to be used for low-level crimes but Ministry of Justice statistics show that these ‘community resolutions’ were used to deal with 431 sex offences last year.

The crimes included sexual assault, grooming and flashing offences, according to The Express. There were eight sexual assault cases on girls under 13 and three on boys under 16. 

Police say this method is only used if the victim agrees for the crime to be dealt with in that way. 

Officers added that some of the offences involved two consenting underage children.

There were also two occasions where police cleared up cases of adults sexually grooming children with the order.

In total there were 29 sexual assaults on women aged 13 or over that were dealt with using community resolutions. 

David Spencer, of the Centre for Crime Prevention said that the public would find it ‘staggering’ that the CPS is using community resolutions in this way, particularly in cases involving children.

A spokesman for the National Police Chiefs’ Council said: ‘Community resolutions help police handle low-level offending proportionately.

‘Victims’ wishes are central to our decision-making. Our decisions are thoroughly examined by force scrutiny panels. Community resolutions are used in one per cent of sexual offence cases.’

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